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EMS Continuing Education

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Available Courses

TargetSolutions offers a comprehensive catalog of online EMS continuing education courses that is accepted in most states. Our courses allow first responders, EMT-Basics, EMT-Intermediates and EMT-Paramedics to complete their continuing education requirements in an engaging and easy-to-use format.


PREPARATORY

Clinical Decision-Making

Not only does treating patients in the prehospital environment have an air of uncertainty to it, but it also requires EMS personnel to work quickly and under a lot of pressure. EMS providers must be able to rapidly gather, weigh, and synthesize information pertaining to their patients. They must also be able to develop and apply patient management plans as fast as possible.

Essentially, EMS personnel must have strong clinical decision-making skills in order to properly do their jobs.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Common Infectious Pathogens

This course is meant to serve as an extension of EMS Infectious Disease Control, which focuses mainly on bloodborne pathogens (BBPs), e.g., HIV, HBV, and HCV. EMS personnel are at risk of contracting a number of infectious diseases apart from BBPs. This course discusses other infectious diseases which may be encountered by healthcare workers, such as Hepatitis A, Tuberculosis, and Meningitis. This course also discusses the appropriate precautions to prevent disease transmission in the pre-hospital setting.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Communication and Documentation

Communication is an essential component of prehospital care. Both verbal and written communication will be used during every response. Patient care includes assessment, treatment, and the ability to effectively and efficiently communicate findings to other health care providers.

Communication occurs from the pre-dispatch phase, throughout the call, and well after the completion of the transport. Various individuals will be involved in the verbal communication process and vital information will be discussed. EMS providers must have excellent verbal and written communication skills to ensure accurate information is delivered to the appropriate individuals. The continuum of patient care is based upon effective and efficient communication skills.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cultural Diversity for EMS Providers

EMS agencies are often at the forefront of meeting this healthcare challenge, placing unique demands on personnel in trying to provide the same high-quality care for all patients irrespective of cultural backgrounds. Differences in language, cultural expectations, and access to primary care services require EMS providers to demonstrate cross-cultural competence in the field.

This course provides an overview of practical strategies for developing cross-cultural competence and providing culturally diverse patients with the best possible care.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Diet & Nutrition

Because providing emergency medical care is physically demanding, taking care of yourself by incorporating proper nutrition and regular exercise into your lifestyle ensures you have the strength and energy to do your job. This training course is designed to provide you with basic information on nutrition, weight control, and physical fitness to help you maintain a healthy weight, prevent disease such as heart disease and diabetes, and fuel your body with the vitamins and minerals it needs to stay strong. This training program has 14 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Emergency Responder Rehabilitation for the EMT

Rehab is a place, an action, and an outcome. The goal of emergency operations rehab is to minimize stress and heat related illness and death with medical monitoring, rapid response, as well as rest, food, and fluid interventions. In this course, learn about need for medical monitoring and rehab, common injuries during emergency incidents and training events, rehab practices, and key components of a rehab protocol.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Understand the need for medical monitoring and rehabilitation during emergency operations and training exercises, identify common injuries and their causes during emergency operations, assess emergency responders for illness or injury in the rehab area, treat emergency responders in the rehab area, and discuss key components of a protocol for EMS support of emergency operations

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Emergency Responder Rehabilitation for the Paramedic Advanced

This course, which is guided by NFPA Standard 1584, provides a detailed approach to the roles and responsibilities of all parties during EMS Emergency Responder Rehabilitation, whether during training drills or live incidents.

A well-planned rehab operation is discussed and includes size, location, supplies, and areas within the assessment and treatment of response personnel. Common mechanisms of injury and illness during fireground operations and practice scenarios are also covered; as well as indications of certain treatments and further transport per local protocol.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Ethics for the EMS Provider (BLS)

The phrase emergency medical services (EMS) is used throughout this course. Functionally, the abbreviation includes all first responders, fire rescue, ambulance, law enforcement and others that respond after 911 system activation.

Developing technologies and platform advances often outpace legislative agenda and bioethical reviews, leaving the profession to play catch up amidst a given ethical event. What can and cannot be done, what should or shouldn’t be stated or the decision to provide patient treatments and the withholding of same. All of these are a few just a few examples of the content that will be discussed within this course.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Functional Approach to Physical Fitness for Emergency Responders

In 2004 the U.S. Fire Administration reported 117 firefighter fatalities in the line of duty. As in other years, the leading cause of death was overexertion. Firefighting is one of the most physically demanding jobs. In seconds an emergency responder transitions from a state of rest to peak and sustained aerobic and anaerobic activity that might last minutes or hours. It is critical that all emergency response personnel maintain a good level of physical fitness. This course describes and demonstrates functional training exercises for emergency responder tasks.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Discuss line of duty fatalities and on the job injuries, describe how “functional training” is different than traditional training, demonstrate CORE strengthening and flexibility exercises, and demonstrate functional fitness exercises for emergency responder tasks

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Health & Wellness

Providing emergency medical care is a physically and emotionally demanding career. Over time, these demands can wear you down and tire you out. By maintaining a healthy lifestyle you can ensure you have the strength and energy to do your job safely and efficiently and can tackle stressful situations. This training course was designed to introduce you to the basic concepts of health and wellness to help you improve your quality of life and overall wellness.

Topics include the components of wellness such as mental health, stress management, nutrition, physical activity, and sleep. This training course has 11 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

HIPAA Awareness

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1996 and aims to protect patients’ health information from being improperly used or disclosed. Since 2003, when enforcement of the Privacy Rule began, over 77,000 complaints have been received by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS). Nearly 20,000 of these were investigated, and the organizations that had violated HIPAA were required to make changes to their privacy practices, or take other corrective actions. Some were also forced to pay fines and penalties.

This course reviews the federal HIPAA regulations and discusses the duties and responsibilities that are required of EMS personnel and agencies. It also explains the various rights that HIPAA provides to patients and the safeguards that are required when dealing with patient health information. By complying with HIPAA, you will protect patients’ confidentiality and ensure that any use or disclosure of their information protects you and your organization from legal liability.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

The Human Body Part 1: Critical Systems

Part 1 of the series examined the structure, function, and common problems of the critical body systems, which included the circulatory system, respiratory system, and nervous system. It explored anatomy and physiology from a historic perspective, and addressed the medical terminology used to describe basic anatomical landmarks.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

The Human Body Part 1: Critical Systems Advanced

Part 1 of the series examined the structure, function, and common problems of the critical body systems, which included the circulatory system, respiratory system, and nervous system. It explored anatomy and physiology from a historic perspective, and addressed the medical terminology used to describe basic anatomical landmarks.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

The Human Body Part 2: Other Systems

This course is the second offering in the two-part series: The Human Body. Both EMTs and paramedics must understand anatomy and physiology to varying degrees. Using accurate medical terminology is an absolute requirement in every verbal or written report. Furthermore, forming an impression on a patient requires an understanding of the body systems and processes that are affected by disease or traumatic injury.

Part 2 of the series reviews the structure, function and common problems of the other body systems, which include the musculoskeletal, integumentary, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and endocrine systems. Medical terminology from Part 1 is reviewed.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

The Human Body Part 2: Other Systems Advanced

This course is the second offering in the two-part series: The Human Body. Both EMTs and paramedics must understand anatomy and physiology to varying degrees. Using accurate medical terminology is an absolute requirement in every verbal or written report. Furthermore, forming an impression on a patient requires an understanding of the body systems and processes that are affected by disease or traumatic injury.

Part 2 of the series reviews the structure, function and common problems of the other body systems, which include the musculoskeletal, integumentary, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and endocrine systems. Medical terminology from Part 1 is reviewed.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Infectious Disease Control

Over 1,000 healthcare personnel are injured by contaminated needles and other sharps devices per day in the U.S., according to CDC estimates. These kinds of injuries pose a serious risk because contaminated needles and sharps can transmit bloodborne pathogens such as HIV and Hepatitis B and C. Besides these, over 20 other communicable pathogens can be found in blood and other potentially infectious material encountered at the emergency scene.

To prevent infection, EMS providers need to minimize their exposure by following Standard Precautions and using Personal Protective Equipment to create a barrier of protection. These and other protection strategies are outlined in the Occupational Health & Safety Administration’s Bloodborne Pathogen Standard (BPS).

This course provides an overview of the risks and realities of infectious disease exposure incidents in the prehospital environment. It also reviews the requirements for complying with the BPS and provides practical information on various diseases and protection strategies for EMS providers.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Medical, Ethical, and Legal Issues

There are a variety of ethical and legal issues you will encounter on the job. Awareness of these issues is the first step in protecting yourself from both civil and criminal actions. One of your guiding principles as a provider of emergency medical care is to do no further harm. If you follow this principle, act in good faith, and according to appropriate standards of care, you should avoid legal exposure. This course provides an overview of the key legal and ethical issues you will encounter on the job, including scope of practice, standards of care, negligence, consent, and documentation. Because each state is different, and protocols vary from county to county, seek competent legal advice if you have any questions regarding these issues.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Protecting Yourself from Influenza

Influenza, commonly called “the flu,” is a contagious respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent this illness is by getting a flu vaccination each fall. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.

As an emergency medical provider you will likely be exposed to the influenza virus on the job. This course highlights the signs and symptoms of the flu, as well as the steps you can take to avoid the illness.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Slips, Trips and Falls

Slips, trips and falls can happen in any workplace. But the consequences of emergency response personnel falling on the job can be much greater than those in the rest of the workforce. Slips, trips and falls include any injuries that cause lost work time. Slips, trips and falls may result in trivial injuries to catastrophic injuries. In this course learn common causes, hazards, and injuries. As well as safety techniques and prevention practices for EMTs and firefighters.

This training course has a learning module with a 15-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Therapeutic Communications

Inspired air has an oxygen concentration of approximately 21%. However, when the available atmospheric oxygen is not sufficient or accessible to the patient, a supplemental source of oxygen is required. The supplemental oxygen functions to increase oxygen to the cells and increase the patient’s ability to compensate with breathing difficulties. Several kinds of oxygen delivery devices are available and EMTs need to be familiar with their respective uses.

This course provides an overview of supplemental oxygen delivery. Beginning with a brief look at how to recognize airway problems, this course discusses various topics associated with oxygen delivery, including cylinder safety, methods for calculating oxygen flow duration, types of regulators, as well as differences in the various kinds of delivery devices.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Workplace Stress

Stress is a physical and psychological reaction to the increasing demands of life. When your brain perceives a threat, it signals your body to release a burst of hormones to fuel your response. This is called the fight-or-flight response. Once the threat is gone, your body should return to a relaxed state. However, the nonstop stress of modern life means your alarm system rarely shuts off.

Stress is one of the leading causes of reduced productivity in the workplace. And stress-related illnesses lead to absenteeism. EMS employers need to be aware of the impact of stress on their providers, so they can help employees manage their stress and minimize the impact of stress on the agency.

This course highlights some typical sources of stress, as well as methods of dealing with and reducing stress in your daily life. It is impossible to completely avoid stress, so learning to deal with it is necessary to your health and well-being. This training course has 9 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)



AIRWAY

Advanced Airways: Intubation and Beyond

Every patient must have a patent airway to survive. As a result, airway management and ventilation are the most critical skills in the prehospital environment.

This course is aimed at the advanced emergency responder and discusses only advanced airway procedures, from endotracheal intubation to surgical cricothyrotomy.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Airway Management Advanced

Every patient must have a patent airway to survive. As a result, airway management and ventilation are the most critical skills in the prehospital environment. During the initial assessment of every patient, the EMS responder must first determine if the patient has a patent airway. Always use basic techniques and maneuvers to maintain the airway before progressing to more advanced interventions.

This course highlights basic airway management techniques, such as manual airway maneuvers, basic mechanical airways, suctioning, and oxygenation. In addition, the course reviews advanced airway management techniques, such as tracheobronchial suctioning, endotracheal intubation, and gastric decompression.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Airway Management Basic

Every patient must have a patent airway to survive. When the airway is obstructed, the EMT must clear it as soon as possible using the methods described in this lesson. The only exceptions to this would be situations where it is unsafe, or the airway problem is such that it cannot be treated in the field and the patient must be transported immediately to a hospital. Remember - a patient without an airway is a dead patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Blind Nasotracheal Intubation

Blind nasotracheal intubation offers responders the ability to maintain a patent airway when the oral tracheal route is contraindicated. Despite its critical role in the field, however, performing successful blind nasotracheal intubation can be a challenge because it does not permit the responder to view the glottic opening. Training and increased familiarity with the procedure can help EMS providers overcome these challenges. This course reviews the concept and procedure of blind nasotracheal intubation, including a discussion of indications and contraindications, intubation procedures, and methods of confirming successful tube placement.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Capnography

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Due to the increased use of capnography in the EMS community over the past decade, understanding this tool has become even more important. Capnography is the measurement of carbon dioxide concentrations in exhaled air. It is an essential diagnostic instrument in the prehospital setting. Not only does it provide valuable information for EMTs, such as the evaluation of treatment response, but it is also a noninvasive measurement. This course discusses capnography, the use of capnograms in the EMS industry, and a variety of conditions that benefit from a capnographic reading.

A thorough knowledge of capnography is essential in prehospital patient care.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Introduction to Capnography Advanced

Capnography is a measure of the overall ventilation status of the patient. It measures carbon dioxide production at the cellular level. In this course learn capnogram interpretation, abnormal patterns, and clinical applications for capnography.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Mechanics of Breathing

Understanding how breathing works is critical to identifying and assessing respiratory pathologies. A proper understanding of the respiratory system and how O2, CO2, and other respiratory measurements should be assessed can help EMS personnel determine the point at which the respiratory cycle may be breaking down. Is the patient receiving enough oxygen? Is that oxygen being used efficiently by the body? These kinds of questions can help guide treatment to ensure that the interventions provided are the most effective and appropriate to the patient's condition.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Orotracheal Intubation

Orotracheal intubation is the most common type of endotracheal intubation. In the prehospital environment it can provide a vital means of ventilation for a patient whose airway is compromised. Despite its critical role in the field, however, intubation is not always implemented successfully. Up to 25% of endotracheal intubations are misplaced.

This course provides a review of orotracheal intubation, including a discussion of indications and contraindications, intubation of trauma and non-trauma patients, intubation of pediatric patients, and methods of confirming successful tube placement.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Respiratory System A&P Review

The process of breathing and respiration is a primary bodily function required to sustain life. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and physiological function of the structures of the respiratory system will assist EMS personnel in providing adequate medical care to those in need. This course will describe the basic components and functions of the respiratory system and how to differentiate between adequate and inadequate respiration.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Suctioning the Patient Airway

Airway management is one of the most critical skills of treating patients in the prehospital environment. Due to the unstable nature of prehospital patient care, maintaining a patient's airway is not an easy task, especially when it is blocked by a foreign object. Obstructed airways can quickly compromise a patient's survival. Therefore, it is necessary that EMS providers have an exceptional understanding of suctioning the airway.

This course examines the skill of suctioning a patient's airway, including special considerations EMS providers must take into account when performing this action.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Supplemental Oxygen

Inspired air has an oxygen concentration of approximately 21%. However, when the available atmospheric oxygen is not sufficient or accessible to the patient, a supplemental source of oxygen is required. The supplemental oxygen functions to increase oxygen to the cells and increase the patient's ability to compensate with breathing difficulties. Several kinds of oxygen delivery devices are available and EMTs need to be familiar with their respective uses.

This course provides an overview of supplemental oxygen delivery. Beginning with a brief look at how to recognize airway problems, this course discusses various topics associated with oxygen delivery, including cylinder safety, methods for calculating oxygen flow duration, types of regulators, as well as differences in the various kinds of delivery devices. Additionally, the course reviews conditions for using oxygen humidifiers, and special considerations and procedures for patients with stomas, for pediatric patients, and for patients with facial trauma or dental appliances.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Tracheostomies Advanced

A tracheostomy is a surgical procedure that creates a tracheal stoma to facilitate respiration. In hospital settings, it is among the most common surgical procedures performed on critically ill patients. This means paramedics need to be prepared to respond to assist patients with tracheostomies by understanding the unique features of tracheostomy care so that they can provide effective suctioning, tube replacement, and ventilation when needed.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)


PATIENT ASSESSMENT

Assessing the Patient with Major Trauma

Proper assessment of a patient with a major traumatic injury is crucial. Not only does this assessment determine the extent of the patient's injuries, but it also aids in determining patient care priorities. EMS providers face unique challenges when assessing a patient with a major trauma injury because not only do they have to determine any immediate life-threatening injuries, but they also have to consider any threats that may leave the patient with any long-term disabilities. This course discusses assessment techniques for making the initial impression of patients as well as assessment elements specific to certain types of trauma injuries.

Quick and thorough assessment of a trauma patient is the cornerstone for providing proper treatment and may ad in preventing death or permanent disability.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Patient Assessment Advanced

Patient assessment is a structured method of evaluating a patient's condition. An organized and well- developed patient assessment serves as a valuable tool for the provision of patient care. Patient assessment is the process of looking for, asking about, and recognizing the symptoms and signs of an abnormal condition. Because a patient's condition can change quickly, the assessment process continues throughout the time spent with a patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Patient Assessment Basic

Patient assessment is a structured method of evaluating a patient's condition. An organized, well- developed patient assessment is a valuable tool for providing patient care. Patient assessment is the process of looking for, asking about, and recognizing the symptoms and signs of an abnormal condition. It is a process that continues throughout the time spent with a patient because a patient's condition can change quickly. Continual assessment allows the EMS provider to recognize critical situations early and to influence patient outcomes positively.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Rapid Secondary Assessment

Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death for children and adults under 44 years of age, and patients with severe trauma pose a significant challenge in the prehospital environment. Rapid secondary assessment plays a critical role in the care of such patients. For trauma patients with a significant mechanism of injury, it provides a more thorough means of assessing the patients' injuries and condition. When performed properly, rapid trauma assessment is both thorough and quick, and provides the EMS provider with a better understanding of the patient's injuries and their severity so that he or she can make better informed decision about patient care.

This course provides an overview of rapid secondary assessment. It aims to give EMS providers a better understanding of the importance and method of performing a rapid secondary assessment over each major body section, from head to toe.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Special Challenges in Patient Assessment

Assessment of a patient is extremely important and performing a thorough and accurate assessment can be the key to saving a patient's life. In some cases, however, the difficulty of providing an accurate assessment and taking a thorough patient history increases. For example, the emergency provider may face challenges such as language barriers, intoxication, refusal to talk, and mental illness. The emergency provider must learn the skills to effectively work around these situations to initiate and complete an appropriate patient assessment to ensure successful care and positive outcomes.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)


MEDICAL

Acute Coronary Syndromes

In this course, learn and explore the assessment and treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The course begins by defining ACS and how to assess ACS. Learn the different types of ACS. The course concludes by exploring the treatment and transportation triage situations for acute considerations.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Advanced

Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome is a condition that all EMS providers should be familiar with. It involves fluid accumulation within the lungs, and rapid treatment and transport are vital to ensure the survival of the patient. Though the mortality rate of ARDS has decreased in recent years because of advances in modern medicine, it remains extremely fatal, and the exact causes of it are still ambiguous at best.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Allergic Reaction Management

An allergic reaction is an exaggerated immune response to a particular substance. About 41 million Americans have allergic sensitivities that put them at risk for developing the most severe form of allergic reaction—anaphylaxis. Recognize the signs and symptoms of progression, from nuisance reaction to anaphylaxis. Learn prompt recognition and early treatment with epinephrine, paramount to anaphylaxis survival.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Allergies and Anaphylaxis Advanced

Allergic disorders are leading a cause of chronic illness in the United States, affecting more than 20% of people. Allergic reactions can result from several different allergens and can range from very mild to severe. A severe allergic reaction, known as anaphylaxis, is a life-threatening emergency. The ability to recognize and manage anaphylaxis is possibly the only thing standing between a patient and imminent death. This course highlights common allergens, assessment, and management of the patient with an allergic reaction, and administration of epinephrine.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Allergies and Anaphylaxis Basic

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Allergic reactions can be stressful and serious events for everyone involved. As an EMS responder, you must determine the severity of the condition and manage any life-threats. This course will describe the physiology of allergies and anaphylaxis in the body, help you recognize the signs and symptoms of mild, moderate, and severe cases of allergies and anaphylaxis, and explain procedures for emergency medical treatment of allergic reactions.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Altered Mental Status Advanced

Altered mental status is any change in the way a person acts or behaves and may indicate an emergent or already serious problem. It may be caused by a variety of conditions. The course reviews the pathophysiology of three common causes of altered mental status - diabetic conditions, seizures, and stroke. In addition, this course outlines the ALS emergency medical care for these patients, including patient assessment and appropriate interventions.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Altitude Emergencies

Altitude can endanger the patient in several ways. The decrease in oxygen availability puts the patient at risk for acute mountain sickness, high-altitude pulmonary edema, and high altitude cerebral edema. Additionally, the often-extreme temperature drops can put the patient at risk for hypothermia and frostbite. To increase the difficulty, symptoms of both altitude illness and hypothermia are similar and resemble those of dehydration and low blood pressure. Successful rescue requires prompt recognition of symptoms, careful and rapid management, and immediate transport.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Altitude Illness

Altitude illness affects those who ascend to high altitudes too quickly. It generally only occurs over 8,000 feet but has been observed at lower altitudes. In its mildest form, it can be merely irritating, but at its most severe, it can be fatal. In this course, learn the causes, assessment, and treatment for altitude illness.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Altitude Illness Advanced

Altitude illness affects those who ascend to high altitudes too quickly. It generally only occurs over 8,000 feet but has been observed at lower altitudes. In its mildest form, it can be merely irritating, but at its most severe, it can be fatal. In this course, learn the causes, assessment, and treatment for altitude illness.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Aquatic Emergencies

Aquatic emergencies present high-pressure situations for the emergency responder. In many cases, the victim will be a young child, which may present unique challenges to the rescuer. Drowning emergencies can also confuse rescuers as some victims can survive prolonged immersion and cardiac arrest while appearing lifeless. Emergency services personnel must possess an acute awareness of the pathophysiology of drowning and diving emergencies and the proper care for a patient in an aquatic emergency.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Asthma Advanced

Asthma, otherwise known as reactive airway disease affects between 10-15 million in the U.S., and it leads to the deaths of over 4000 people a year. Approximately 50% of patients suffering from a prehospital asthma attack die before arrival to the hospital. Therefore, prompt recognition and appropriate treatment on the part of the EMS provider are vital. Asthma attacks need to be managed aggressively.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Asthma Part 1

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by increased reactivity of the airway to a stimulus. Review asthma epidemiology, anatomy, and pathophysiology. Learn to identify the causes of asthma and to assess its signs and symptoms of asthma.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Asthma Part 2

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by increased reactivity of the airway to a stimulus. This course discusses effective prehospital treatments for management of acute asthma attacks. It concludes with information on prevention of asthma attacks.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Behavioral Emergencies Advanced

The EMS provider will respond to many situations involving behavioral emergencies. Some of these result from an injury or acute illness of the patient. Others are the result of mental illness or the use of mind altering substances. Mental health issues incapacitate more people that all other health problems combined. Some estimate that 20% of the population suffers from mental health problems and that one person out of every seven will require treatment for an emotional disturbance. When caring for these patients, remain calm and treat the patient with respect. Restraints are the best LAST option in a behavioral emergency.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Behavioral Emergencies Basic

EMS professionals will respond to many situations involving behavioral emergencies. Some of these result from an injury or acute illness of the patient. Others are the result of mental illness or the use of mind altering substances. Mental health issues incapacitate more people that all other health problems combined. Some estimate that 20% of the population suffers from mental health problems and that one person out of every seven will require treatment for an emotional disturbance. When caring for these patients, remain calm and treat the patient with respect. Restraints are the best LAST option in a behavioral emergency.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Calcium Channel Blocker Overdose

Calcium channel blockers are prescribed to millions of patients to treat angina, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and to prevent migraine headaches. Unfortunately, calcium channel blocker overdose is rapidly becoming the most lethal prescription medication ingestion in the United States. In this course learn the effects of calcium channel blockers, overdose symptoms, and assessment and treatment of calcium channel blocker overdose.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Calcium Channel Blocker Overdose Advanced

Calcium channel blockers are prescribed to millions of patients to treat angina, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and to prevent migraine headaches. Unfortunately, calcium channel blocker overdose is rapidly becoming the most lethal prescription medication ingestion in the United States. In this course learn the effects of calcium channel blockers, overdose symptoms, and assessment and treatment of calcium channel blocker overdose.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide is one of the most inhaled toxins. Because of this, treating patients with carbon monoxide poisoning is an emergency situation EMS providers often face, and because of its common symptoms, carbon monoxide is often misdiagnosed. EMS providers need to have a thorough comprehension of assessing and treating patients suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning while protecting themselves in the process.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cardiac Emergencies Advanced

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More than 600,000 patients die each year from cardiovascular diseases. Half of these deaths occur before the patient reaches the hospital. Many times, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiac disease. Although chest pain is common in cardiovascular emergencies, not all chest pain will result in cardiac arrest. This course highlights the signs and symptoms and the emergency medical care for patients experiencing angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, cardiac tamponade, hypertensive emergency, and cardiogenic shock.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cardiac Emergencies Basic

Every year, cardiovascular disease claims thousands of lives. Half of these deaths occur before the patient even reaches the hospital. In many cases, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiovascular disease. Research has shown that rapid defibrillation is the major determinant of survival in the case of cardiac arrest resulting from ventricular fibrillation. This course will highlight the signs and symptoms of cardiac arrest, as well as the steps to use an automated external defibrillator properly.

However, because not all chest pain will result in cardiac arrest, this course will also review the signs and symptoms of cardiac compromise, as well as the emergency medical care of patients experiencing chest pain.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cardiovascular Anatomy & Physiology Review

For over 80 years, cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in the U.S. More than 80 million people in America suffer from some type of cardiovascular disease. Of these, coronary heart disease is the most prevalent. It remains the leading cause of death nationwide. Because of the prevalence of cardiovascular conditions, it is important for EMS personnel to understand the anatomy and physiology of the heart and of the vascular system.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Advanced

Complementary and alternative medicine is a collection of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are used by millions of Americans to treat or lessen disease. This presentation explores common CAM treatments, their impact on EMS, and the adverse effects of some CAM treatments and supplements.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Basic

Complementary and alternative medicine is a collection of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are used by millions of Americans to treat or lessen disease. This presentation explores common CAM treatments, their impact on EMS, and the adverse effects of some CAM treatments and supplements.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Complete Resuscitation: Integrating Post-Care Advanced

Proper care of a cardiac arrest patient is essential, and this care does not stop once the patient regains a pulse. Integration of appropriate post-resuscitation care in your management of the cardiac arrest patient is crucial. In fact, once a patient's pulse is reestablished, the actions taken next by EMS providers may determine whether the patient survives. This course attempts to show a complete picture of cardiac arrest management by going beyond initial resuscitation and discussing the pathophysiology of cardiac arrest and what providers must do to both reestablish and pulse and then fully continue care through arrival at the hospital.

This course focuses specifically on adult patients. For pediatric cardiac arrest considerations, see the course EMS Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Cyanide Poisoning

Cyanide exists in many products, and the incomplete combustion of certain items such as wood, paper, plastic, and synthetics make it a very real, potential hazard to those who fight fires. All emergency responders should recognize safety hazards and minimize the risks associated with cyanide poisoning. With this course, learn to identify the signs and symptoms of cyanide exposure, as well as antidote and supportive treatments.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cyanide Poisoning Advanced

Cyanide exists in many products, and the incomplete combustion of certain items such as wood, paper, plastic, and synthetics make it a very real, potential hazard to those who fight fires. All emergency responders should recognize safety hazards and minimize the risks associated with cyanide poisoning. With this course, learn to identify the signs and symptoms of cyanide exposure, as well as antidote and supportive treatments.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Date Rape Drugs

Drugs used to facilitate sexual assault are becoming increasingly available to teens, young adults, and perpetrators of sexual assault of all ages. The U.S. Department of Justice estimates that nearly half million individuals are victimized by sexual assault in the U.S. every year. Many of these incidents involve the use of illegal or illegitimately used substances that cause the victim to experience significant psychosocial and physiological health effects and lose consciousness or retain little memory of events surrounding the assault. Responding to such emergencies poses numerous challenges to EMS personnel.

This course aims to familiarize EMS workers with the incidence, effects, and characteristics of date rape drug emergencies and prepare them to respond.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Death and Dying Advanced

Little time is spent on discussing and studying death and its effect on the EMS provider, the patient, the patient’s family, and others intimately concerned with a particular death. This course explores topics associated with death including: Do Not Resuscitate orders, when not to transport or treat and the psychological effects of death on the survivors (including healthcare providers).

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Dementia

Dementia is not actually a specific disease. It is defined as a collection of symptoms caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. In this course, learn about types of dementia, daily management techniques and assessment and management principles for patients with dementia.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Dementia Advanced

Dementia is not actually a specific disease. It is defined as a collection of symptoms caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. In this course, learn about types of dementia, daily management techniques and assessment and management principles for patients with dementia.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Detailed Physical Exam

This course focuses on the steps necessary to perform a complete detailed physical exam. The properly conducted detailed physical exam provides considerable information about the patient’s injuries or medical condition but can be time consuming. This detailed physical exam is only performed after an initial assessment is completed and all life threats are controlled.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Advanced

Nearly 8% of the U.S. population has diabetes. When diabetics do not have enough insulin or are unable to use the insulin, hyperglycemia can result, which, when left untreated, can result in diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious diabetic emergency. Each year, over 100,000 patients are admitted to hospitals due to diabetic ketoacidosis. In young patients, the rate of incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis is significantly higher, accounting for 50% of hospital admissions related to diabetes.

This course highlights the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis and the practical guidelines for assessment and management of patients suspected of suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis, including a special consideration of pediatric patients. It also compares diabetic ketoacidosis with another similar diabetic emergency, nonketotic hyperosmolar coma.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Disease Conditions of Chronic Alcoholism Advanced

Abuse of alcohol and its related problems is pervasive in EMS patients. Alcohol consumption causes immediate illness and injury, but it also has a cumulative negative health impact. In many EMS calls, alcohol is the likely cause or a relevant contributor to our patient’s problems. In this continuing education module, we will first seek to understand alcoholism and then explore the disease conditions of chronic alcoholism.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Ecstasy Abuse Management

Ecstasy belongs to a group of drugs called designer drugs, which are manufactured by taking existing therapeutic medications and chemically altering them to create new drugs with different effects. Use of ecstasy is growing in all demographic groups. In this course, learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of ecstasy use and treat a patient suffering from the effects of ecstasy use.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Ecstasy Abuse Management Advanced

Ecstasy belongs to a group of drugs called designer drugs, which are manufactured by taking existing therapeutic medications and chemically altering them to create new drugs with different effects. Use of ecstasy is growing in all demographic groups. In this course, learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of ecstasy use and treat a patient suffering from the effects of ecstasy use.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Endocrine System Emergencies Advanced

Endocrine and diabetic emergencies are becoming increasingly common in the field. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S., and the number of newly diagnosed patients continues to grow each year. Additionally, those encountered in the field are often undiagnosed, a condition shared by millions of people.

This course aims to provide EMS responders with the knowledge necessary for assessing and managing patients suffering from endocrine and diabetic emergencies. The course also discusses both healthy endocrine system functioning and pathophysiological functioning, including healthy non-diabetic cellular metabolism and that of a diabetic system.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Epilepsy

Epilepsy affects about 2 million Americans (CDC, 2010). According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 10% of people will experience a seizure sometime during their lifetime and about 3% will have had a diagnosis of epilepsy by age 80. Despite the widespread incidence of epilepsy, however, its underlying causes are still not well understood. To date, it remains an untreatable condition. Because seizures pose a risk of adverse and severe health consequences, EMS personnel face a significant challenge in responding to seizure incidents and managing the patients so that these risks are minimized.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fundamentals of 12 Lead ECG Operation and Interpretation

Operation and interpretation of 12 lead ECGs is increasingly becoming a skill that is demanded in the prehospital environment. Use of 12 lead ECGs can give providers a much clearer picture of a patient's condition and can favorably increase patient outcomes. For example, prehospital 12 leads have been shown to increase EMS-to-balloon times in STEMI patients. A 2002 study of the attitudes of cardiologists and emergency physicians toward prehospital ECGs found that most cardiologists and EPs found them to be beneficial.

This course will serve as an introduction in to the interpretation of an ECG and will include the following aspects: electrode placement and ECG leads, the Autonomic Nervous System, automaticity, methods of determining the heart rate, and regularity of rhythm on an ECG.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

H1N1 (Swine Flu)

EMS responders play an important role in attending to patients with the H1N1 virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control, "Prehospital patient care is provided in an uncontrolled environment, often confined to a very small space, and frequently requires rapid medical decision-making, and interventions with limited information." EMS personnel not only have to use their skills to help H1N1 patients in need, but they have to protect themselves from contracting the virus as well. This course provides information on the H1N1 virus for EMS responders, including symptoms, patient management, disinfection techniques, and how to protect themselves.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

HazMat Medical Emergencies Advanced

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HazMat Medical Emergencies Advanced will introduce some advanced concepts and care for all Advanced Life Support (ALS) personnel and provide an ideal refresher for those ALS-trained individuals currently working the HazMat (HMT) specialty.

Going into this course, students must have a thorough understanding of Advanced Life Support (ALS) medical terminology. The material in this course is presented as a survey on the broad context of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high yield explosives (CBRNE) so prerequisite knowledge of these concepts is required. The care and treatment of all patients encountered should fall within the level of training, the scope of care of the paramedic, the medical protocol of the supervising medical director, and, as it pertains to patients exposed to CBRNE hazardous materials, the guidance of the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

The Target Solutions HazMat Medical Emergencies course is a robust introduction to the complex management of HazMat medical emergency patients. For the paramedic already trained in this specialty, this curse serves as an ideal refresher. For all HazMat first responders, understanding how to treat the patient correctly requires good pre-planning, thorough assessment, familiarity with the advanced instrumentation that detect background and patient diagnostic abnormalities, knowledge of the toxidromes and the drug formulary. While this course presents evidence based information from a plethora of national sources and standards, ultimately local medical control will be the final arbiter and the AHJ over drug administration, dosages, and clinical indications.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Heat Illness and Emergencies

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EMS responders are often called upon to treat patients suffering from heat-related illnesses. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control, 1,700 people die in the U.S. each year as a result of heat stroke during hot, humid weather. Not only is this ailment common, but EMS responders also face unique challenges when caring for patients suffering from heat illness because high body temperatures can damage the brain or other vital organs. Prompt and skilled action is necessary when treating patients suffering from heat illness emergencies.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hematology

Hematology is the study of blood and the organs that form blood. Hematological disorders include anemia, hemophilia, lymphoma, and sickle cell disease, among others. Rescuers who understand how hematology and hematological dysfunction affect the body's systems can perform more studied assessments and provide better treatment to patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

HIV/AIDS Awareness

When providing emergency medical care, there is a strong possibility that you will contact blood and other bodily fluids. Exposure to such fluids or materials could result in transmission of pathogens which can lead to disease or death. One such potentially infectious pathogen includes the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), the virus that causes AIDS.

The AIDS epidemic continues to be a serious public health problem with profound consequences for our society. Between 650,000 and 900,000 people in the United States have been infected with HIV, and the disease continues to spread. There is no vaccine or cure for this disease. Now, more than ever before, all our communities face the challenge of working together to stop the epidemic. This course highlights how HIV is spread and what to do if you are exposed.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Intraosseous Infusion Advanced

Intraosseous infusion is an effective, life-saving procedure for patients for whom peripheral intravenous cannulation is difficult or unavailable. It provides EMS personnel with the means to quickly and safely administer fluids or medications. For this reason, the intraosseous route has persisted over the past several decades as a common means of establishing venous access for pediatric patients. It is also increasingly being recognized and used for adult patients. Recent technological developments have also added to its scope.

This course provides an overview of intraosseous infusion and discusses the various sites and devices that may be used for pediatric and/or adult patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Intro to Arrhythmias: Escape Rhythms and Premature Complexes

Every year, thousands of patients are brought to emergency departments across the country for treatment for rhythm disturbances and the health complications with which they are associated. Additionally, over 800,000 patients are admitted to hospitals each year for treatment for arrhythmias. Yet countless more individuals in apparently good health also experience irregular heart rhythms and suffer no apparent adverse health effects.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Intro to Arrhythmias: Tachy-arrhythmias and Fibrillation

Approximately 300,000 people each year are treated by EMS professionals for cardiac arrest. Of these patients, only about 8% survive and for cases of sudden cardiac arrest, an estimated 95% do not reach the hospital alive. The most common causes of these types of cardiac arrests are ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. To ensure the kind of quality patient care that provides patient's with the optimal chance of survival, EMS professionals need to understand the causes and treatments for tachy- arrhythmias and fibrillation.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Managing Cardiac Arrest: During and After Resuscitation

Managing cardiac arrest requires great skill and knowledge on the part of the emergency provider. A patient suffering from cardiac arrest has a very small window of time in which resuscitation will be successful and without brain damage. Therefore, it is essential for EMS providers to have a firm grasp on cardiac arrest and management techniques for this emergency.

This course discusses treating patients suffering from cardiac arrest, including management techniques after resuscitation.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Medication Errors

A recent survey of paramedics found that over 9% had committed a medication error in the previous 12 months. Four percent of these medication errors were never reported.

When a medication error occurs in the prehospital setting, the consequences can be serious. For the patient, the error can cause adverse health effects that could be life threatening. For the person that commits the medication error and the agency they work for, there can also be consequences, especially if the error was not reported.

This course provides a general overview of medication errors in the prehospital setting. It discusses the various kinds of medication errors that can occur as well as strategies for preventing them. It also covers how to investigate the underlying causes of medication errors and why reporting errors is important.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Methamphetamine

Methamphetamine abuse is a serious problem. According to one national survey, approximately 10 million people in the U.S. have tried methamphetamine at least once. And due to its highly addictive nature, the number of these who have become addicted is likely significant. The consequences of meth abuse are devastating and wide-ranging, affecting the medical, psychological, and social arenas. The societal burdens of the drug, such as addiction, premature death, and drug treatment, cost the U.S. an estimated $23.4 billion (RAND, 2005). Not surprisingly, first responders often find themselves on the front lines, confronting the most severe symptoms and effects of the methamphetamine problem.

This course aims to provide EMS personnel with an understanding of the methamphetamine problem, its impact on users, and its associated hazards for EMS workers.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

MRSA Infections

This course provides an overview of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discusses key topics of concern to emergency providers.

Through this course, EMTs will gain a better understanding of the risks of MRSA, how it is transmitted, how to identify infection, how MRSA patients are managed, and how transmission can be prevented. Additionally, the course discusses the importance of cleaning and disinfection and post-exposure procedures.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Myths and Realities of Drug Seeking Behavior Advanced

More Americans abuse controlled prescription medications than cocaine and heroin combined. Emergency department visits for Vicodin abuse have increased 500% in the last ten years. Drug seekers go to extreme and bizarre lengths to obtain medication. Differentiating drug abuse, tolerance, dependence, and addiction is crucial to understanding drug seeking behavior. Learn to identify traits of drug seeking behaviors and manage seekers in the field.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Myths and Realities of Drug Seeking Behavior Basic

More Americans abuse controlled prescription medications than cocaine and heroin combined. Emergency department visits for Vicodin abuse have increased 500% in the last ten years. Drug seekers go to extreme and bizarre lengths to obtain medication. Differentiating drug abuse, tolerance, dependence, and addiction is crucial to understanding drug seeking behavior. Learn to identify traits of drug seeking behaviors and manage seekers in the field.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Narcotics Overdose for the EMT

EMTs and paramedics regularly encounter patients that take narcotics as prescribed or recreationally. In this course, learn about the history and pharmacology of narcotics and why they are used medicinally and recreationally. This course reviews assessment principles for a narcotics overdose event and explains treatment and transport considerations for the narcotics overdose patient.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Understand the history and pharmacology of narcotic analgesics, review assessment of the narcotics overdose event, and explain emergency treatment and transport considerations for the overdose patient

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Narcotics Overdose for the Paramedic Advanced

EMTs and paramedics regularly encounter patients that take narcotics as prescribed or recreationally. In this course, learn about the history and pharmacology of narcotics and why they are used medicinally and recreationally. This course reviews assessment principles for a narcotics overdose event and explains treatment and transport considerations for the narcotics overdose patient.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Understand the history and pharmacology of narcotic analgesics, review assessment of the narcotics overdose event, and explain emergency treatment and transport considerations for the overdose patient

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Non-Traumatic Abdominal Injuries

Abdominal pain is a common complaint and can result from a variety of conditions with similar symptoms, making it very difficult to diagnose. You do NOT need to diagnose the cause of non-traumatic abdominal pain in the field, but you must recognize that acute abdominal pain may be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. Always treat acute abdominal pain as a serious condition until proven otherwise.

This course reviews the anatomy and physiology of the abdomen, the steps to assess a patient with acute abdominal pain, and the appropriate emergency medical care.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Non-Traumatic Chest Pain

Chest pain is a symptom of potentially serious underlying complications. It can indicate the presence of life-threatening respiratory or myocardial dysfunctions requiring immediate medical care. Unfortunately, prehospital interventions are not always effective. More than half of deaths associated with STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) occur in the prehospital environment, and one third of STEMI patients die within 24 hours after ischemia begins.

This course provides a review of assessment and care considerations unique to patients presenting with non-traumatic chest pain. Topics discussed include the prevalence and significance of chest pain and the underlying conditions that can cause it. Specific common conditions such as coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure are also covered as well as general principles and procedures of ECG monitoring.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Obstetrical Emergencies Advanced

You may encounter a number of pregnancy-related complications in the field. Some are minor, but some may be serious and life-threatening. While childbirth normally occurs in a hospital, it does occur in the prehospital setting on rare occasions. Because of the infrequency, taking care of an anxious mother and newborn infant is a stressful emergency call for the EMT. Knowledge and practice can decrease stress and lead to better mother and child care.

The goal of this course is to provide you the information you need to understand and begin management of most common obstetrical and gynecological emergencies.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Operating an AED

More than 600,000 patients die each year from cardiovascular diseases. Half of these deaths occur before the patient reaches the hospital. Many times, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiac disease. Research has shown that rapid defibrillation is the major determinant of survival in cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation.

This course highlights the signs and symptoms of cardiac compromise, the steps to take to use an automated external defibrillator (AED) properly, special considerations and precautions involving the use of an AED.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Over the Counter Drug Overdoses Advanced

Over-the-counter or OTC drug abuse is on the rise. Since 2000 there has been a four-fold increase in cold medicine abuse. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs are the 3rd most commonly intentionally overdosed medicine. Acetaminophen overdose is responsible for the greatest number of drug overdose hospital admissions. This training discusses four of the most commonly abused OTC drugs. The course also explores the importance of an accurate patient history and appropriate treatments.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pain Management

Despite the ability to treat most patients with pain, pain is significantly under treated in all healthcare settings, including prehospital. In this course, explore barriers to under treatment of pain, pain assessment techniques, and affirm the power of prehospital personnel to diminish patient pain. Learn pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment principles.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pain Management Advanced

Despite the ability to treat most patients with pain, pain is significantly under treated in all healthcare settings, including prehospital. In this course, explore barriers to under treatment of pain, pain assessment techniques, and affirm the power of prehospital personnel to diminish patient pain. Learn pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment principles.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pain Transmission, Perception, and Assessment

Pain is the leading emergency medicine complaint. Patients expect EMS to acknowledge their pain, assess it and treat it. EMS, like all areas of healthcare, is not meeting this basic patient expectation. The first step in improving assessment and treatment of pain is to understand pain transmission, perception, and assessment.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pain Transmission, Perception, and Assessment Advanced

Pain is the leading emergency medicine complaint. Patients expect EMS to acknowledge their pain, assess it and treat it. EMS, like all areas of healthcare, is not meeting this basic patient expectation. The first step in improving assessment and treatment of pain is to understand pain transmission, perception, and assessment.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pharmacology Advanced

Providing the proper medication in an emergency is critical to the well-being of the patient. As a paramedic, you are often responsible for administering medication to a patient. This responsibility must not be taken lightly. While administering the proper medications can improve a patient's well-being or even save his life, there are risks. Medications used or delivered inappropriately can cause harm or even death to the patient.

The goal of this course is to provide comprehensive information regarding pharmacology and introduce the medications most commonly used in the prehospital environment. In addition to covering commonly used medications, the course will discuss legal considerations, medication rights administration, routes of administration, special considerations, and drug profiles.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pharmacology Basic

Giving the proper medication in an emergency situation is critical to the well-being of the patient. As a prehospital care provider, you carry several medications that you may give a patient under specific conditions. In addition, you can assist a patient in self-administering certain prescribed medications with the approval of your medical director. This is a responsibility that must not be taken lightly. While administering the proper medications can improve a patient's well-being, there are risks. Medications used inappropriately can cause harm or even death to the patient.

The goal of this course is to give you a basic understanding of pharmacology and introduce you to the medications you will encounter in the field.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pharmacology & Drug Administration

First responders are varied in their certification levels and the agencies for which they work. The term EMS is used within the context of this course to mean emergency medical services, fire rescue, or for that matter, any other emergency responder rendering aid to a 911 patient.

For EMTs and paramedics, mastery of basic pharmacology is a skill set that is used on almost every call for service. EMTs and paramedics will both apply their knowledge in pharmacology, albeit to varying degrees, during each and every medical history that they take. At a minimum, the basics of pharmacology allow the clinician to discern an additional malady that was not otherwise previously mentioned and factor it into their differential diagnosis and the EMS treatment plan. Therefore, each medication tells a story about the patient and his or her condition.

This course is EMT-centric. Thus the concepts will not be specifically targeted to an advanced life support demographic. However, at times throughout the course, content that addresses Advanced Life Support (ALS) will be indicated.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pharmacology Special Considerations

Why do children need special medication doses? How is their body different from an adult’s? Are there other types of patients that should also be given special consideration? This course discusses special medication considerations for pediatric, geriatric, and obstetrical patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pharmacology Special Considerations Advanced

Why do children need special medication doses? How is their body different from an adult’s? Are there other types of patients that should also be given special consideration? This course discusses special medication considerations for pediatric, geriatric, and obstetrical patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Poisoning and Overdose

Thousands of children are poisoned every year as they explore their environments. Many adults also overdose on medication, either accidentally or deliberately. With early prehospital management, the vast majority of these patients have better outcomes.

This course highlights how poisons enter the body, the emergency care of poisoning or overdose, and the administration of activated charcoal for patients with poisoning or overdose.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Poisons and Toxins Part 1

Anything ingested, inhaled, absorbed or injected in a great enough amount can be poisonous. How you treat patients who have been poisoned depends on the type of poison, the route of transmission, its effects, and what additional life threats they have suffered. In this course, we will define poisons, explore the routes of transmission and discuss general medical care for patients who have been poisoned.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Define poisons, describe poison transmission routes, and review emergency medical care of poisons

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Poisons and Toxins Part 1 Advanced

Anything ingested, inhaled, absorbed or injected in a great enough amount can be poisonous. How you treat patients who have been poisoned depends on the type of poison, the route of transmission, its effects, and what additional life threats they have suffered. In this course, we will define poisons, explore the routes of transmission and discuss general medical care for patients who have been poisoned.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Define poisons, describe poison transmission routes, and review emergency medical care of poisons.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Poisons and Toxins Part 2

We often think of poison emergencies only as accidental or intentional drug overdoses. However, poison emergencies can happen to anyone and don’t always involve drugs. In this course, we will review types of poison emergencies, describe general treatment and assessment principles, overview commonly encountered poisons, and provide resources to find more information.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Review types of poison emergencies, describe general assessment and treatment principles, and overview commonly encountered poisons

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Poisons and Toxins Part 2 Advanced

We often think of poison emergencies only as accidental or intentional drug overdoses. However, poison emergencies can happen to anyone and don’t always involve drugs. In this course, we will review types of poison emergencies, describe general treatment and assessment principles, overview commonly encountered poisons, and provide resources to find more information.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Review types of poison emergencies, describe general assessment and treatment principles, and overview commonly encountered poisons

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Prehospital Pulmonary Embolism Care

A pulmonary embolism is a blood clot in one of the pulmonary arteries. It is a fairly common disorder, affecting about 650,000 people in the United States a year. Urgent care of victims of a pulmonary embolism is essential as about 11% of victims of this artery blockage die within the first hour of onset, and approximately 38% succumb within the second hour.

Like most emergency response incidents, a pulmonary embolism is a time-sensitive ailment; rapid transport is essential.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Recognition and Management of Over the Counter Drug Overdoses

Over-the-counter or OTC drug abuse is on the rise. Since 2000 there has been a four-fold increase in cold medicine abuse. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs are the 3rd most commonly intentionally overdosed medicine. Acetaminophen overdose is responsible for the greatest number of drug overdose hospital admissions. This training discusses four of the most commonly abused OTC drugs. The course also explores the importance of an accurate patient history and appropriate treatments.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Renal Failure Advanced

Over 20 million adults have physiological evidence of chronic kidney disease. Over a half million patients in the U.S. are undergoing treatment for end-stage renal disease, a generally irreversible state requiring renal replacement therapy, dialysis, or kidney transplantation to sustain life. As many patients die while being treated for uremia as from any cancer except lung cancer.

This course aims to provide a general overview of renal failure, including causes, signs and symptoms, possible complications, and recommended patient management strategies. The course covers both acute and chronic types of renal failure as well as renal physiology and dialysis.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Respiratory Emergencies Advanced

Respiratory complaints are a major aspect of EMS, resulting in 28% of all EMS chief complaints according to a US study of over 2.5 million EMS calls. Every year over 200,000 people die from respiratory emergencies. A patient in severe respiratory distress can deteriorate quickly to respiratory arrest. Rapid intervention is essential to increase the patient's chances of survival, and a clear working knowledge of common respiratory conditions is critical.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Respiratory Emergencies Basic

Every year over 200,000 people die from respiratory emergencies. A patient in severe respiratory distress can deteriorate quickly to respiratory arrest. Rapid intervention is essential to increase the patient’s chances of survival, and a clear working knowledge of respiratory emergencies is critical.

The goal of managing the patient with respiratory distress, no matter what the cause, is to re-establish the adequate gas exchange of the gasses to the tissues. Remember that with respiratory emergencies, a careful assessment will help you achieve your goal of helping the patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

TCA Overdose

Since tricyclic antidepressants are widely prescribed to treat patients with major depressive disorders they are frequently available to the suicidal patient. In 2004, there were over 12,000 reported TCA overdoses. In this course learn TCA indications, pharmacology, and assessment and treatment of TCA overdose patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

TCA Overdose Advanced

Since tricyclic antidepressants are widely prescribed to treat patients with major depressive disorders they are frequently available to the suicidal patient. In 2004, there were over 12,000 reported TCA overdoses. In this course learn TCA indications, pharmacology, and assessment and treatment of TCA overdose patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Toxicology and Substance Abuse Advanced

Toxicological emergencies, especially those related to substance abuse, are being encountered in the field with increasingly greater frequency. Unintentional poisoning death rates have been rising steadily since 1992; it is now second only to motor vehicle crashes as a cause of unintentional injury death (CDC 2008), and among people 35 to 54 years old, unintentional poisoning caused more deaths than motor vehicle crashes.

This course reviews the toxin exposure problem and discusses the various kinds of toxicological emergencies that are commonly encountered along with assessment findings and patient management procedures unique to each type of toxin exposure. Special emphasis is placed on substance abuse and those substances that are most likely to be encountered in the field.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Understanding the Basics of ECGs

The interpretation of arrhythmias on electrocardiograms (ECGs) is increasingly becoming one of the responsibilities of emergency medical technicians in the field. Many departments have even implemented 12 lead ECGs in the field.

This course serves as an introduction to the basics of electrical conduction in the heart, including the fundamentals of using an ECG machine and ECG tools, the normal sinus rhythm, ECG leads, and concepts related to the recognition of arrhythmias on the ECG.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


TRAUMA

Abdominal Trauma Advanced

Abdominal trauma is a serious, potentially life-threatening emergency. The abdominal cavity houses organs vital for normal bodily functioning, such as the liver, kidneys, and pancreas. When injuries affect this area of the body, it is easy to understand how they could put the patient's life in jeopardy. Statistics confirm this, revealing that injuries affecting the abdominal cavity are associated with an increased incidence of morbidity and mortality, especially if there is a delay in surgical intervention.

This course covers both blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma injuries and aims to equip EMS providers to provide accurate assessment and management for patients suffering either or both such injuries. Before launching into a full discussion of patient assessment and management, however, the course reviews foundational material covering abdominal anatomy and pathophysiology. As patient assessment and management of abdominal trauma involves skills that require real-world training, this course is best used as a complement and not a substitute to such training.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Abdominal Trauma Basic

Abdominal trauma is a serious, potentially life-threatening emergency. The abdominal cavity houses organs vital for normal bodily functioning, such as the liver, kidneys, and pancreas. When injuries affect this area of the body, it is easy to understand how they could put the patient's life in jeopardy. Statistics confirm this, revealing that injuries affecting the abdominal cavity are associated with an increased incidence of morbidity and mortality, especially if there is a delay in surgical intervention.

This course covers both blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma injuries and aims to equip EMS providers with the knowledge to provide accurate assessment and management for patients suffering either or both such injuries. Before launching into a full discussion of patient assessment and management, however, the course reviews foundational material covering abdominal anatomy and pathophysiology.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Amputation Injuries Advanced

Every year over 30,000 traumatic amputations take place, and 75% of pediatric amputations are due to traumatic accidents. In traumatic amputations, the potential for success in reattaching the amputated body part is highly contingent upon the quality of the prehospital care provided. For this reason, EMS providers play a significant role in the survival and recovery of patients who experience traumatic amputations.

This course provides a general overview of amputation injuries and discusses assessment strategies and patient management considerations. The course also surveys the various types of amputation injuries that may be encountered, the pathophysiology of such injuries and strategies for hemorrhage control and for providing the optimal chance for survival and for successful reattachment.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Bleeding and Shock Advanced

Trauma is the leading cause of death in the United States for persons between the ages of 1 and 44. Understanding the mechanism of injury and relevant signs and symptoms of bleeding and shock (hypoperfusion) is of paramount importance when dealing with the traumatized patient. This course highlights techniques to control external bleeding, as well as the signs, symptoms, and care for shock.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Bleeding and Shock Basic

Trauma is the leading cause of death in the United States for persons between the ages of 1 and 44. Understanding the mechanism of injury and relevant signs and symptoms of bleeding and shock (hypoperfusion) is of paramount importance when dealing with the traumatized patient. This course highlights techniques to control external bleeding, as well as the signs, symptoms, and care for shock.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Bomb Blast Injuries Advanced

Bomb blasts can result in a large number of victims with a broad range of combined injuries. While statistics suggest that many of these are usually non-critical soft-tissue injuries, a significant number can be life-threatening. Because of the widespread devastation caused by such incidents and the unique injury patterns involved, caring for patients at these kinds of emergencies can be a challenge. EMS providers must be able to quickly perform triage, using their knowledge of the physics of bomb blasts both to locate the patients in greatest need of treatment and to assess them for the kinds of injuries resulting from explosions.

* (Dec. 2006). Bombings: Injury Patterns and Care. Blast Injuries Module.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Burn Management Advanced

Burn injuries are a form of trauma that can be very distracting to the EMS provider because of the look and smell of the burn. These injuries have high mortality rates and can result in lengthy rehabilitation, cosmetic disfigurement, psychosocial problems, and permanent physical disabilities for the patient. When providing emergency care for these types of injuries, focus on the treatment of life-threatening injuries if they are present even though the burn may consume attention. This course highlights the different types of burn injuries and how to treat them to prevent further injury and reduce contamination.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Burn Management Basic

Burn injuries are a form of trauma that can be very distracting to the EMS provider because of the look and smell of the burn. These injuries have high mortality rates and can result in lengthy rehabilitation, cosmetic disfigurement, psychosocial problems, and permanent physical disabilities for the patient. When providing emergency care for these types of injuries, focus on the treatment of life-threatening injuries if they are present even though the burn may consume attention. This course highlights the different types of burn injuries and how to treat them to prevent further injury and reduce contamination.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Cervical Spine Injuries Part 1 Advanced

A 1995 survey reported that 39% of high school varsity football players sustained injuries. Of those injuries only 39% occurred during competition. 93% of football injuries were “new” or first time injuries. Due to advances in athletic equipment and rule changes there has been a 3% decline in serious injuries since the 1995 survey. Spinal cord injuries do still occur however, often leading to serious injuries, so emergency responders need to have a good base of knowledge in the proper management of c-spine injuries.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Review C-spine anatomy, discuss mechanisms of C-spine injury, review signs and symptoms of C-spine injury, and explore guidelines for injury evaluation and treatment, including life threats

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

CNS Injuries Advanced

Every year, brain, skull, and spinal cord injuries contribute to numerous patient fatalities at accident scenes. In the United States, approximately 12,000 patients survive their spinal cord injuries, many of whom will suffer severe, debilitating effects that can last throughout their lives. EMS providers play a critical role in assessing injuries to the central nervous system (CNS) and minimizing the chance of further injury by providing effective spinal-motion restriction. Errors can be devastating. It has been estimated that up to one-quarter of spinal cord injuries may be made significantly worse during extrication or early treatment after a motor vehicle accident.

This course provides an overview of the anatomy of the spine and CNS and highlights the signs of spinal injury, assessment and medical care of patients with CNS injuries, and the use of short and long backboards. It has recently been updated to include the latest education standards for EMS personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

CNS Injuries Basic

Head and spinal trauma can result in severe, debilitating injuries. These kinds of injuries can have a significant effect on a person's lifestyle and finances. Over the course of a lifetime, a patient aged 25 at the time of injury will incur over $4.6 million in expenses, as well as lost income due to job loss.

By providing accurate injury assessment and adequate spinal motion restriction, EMS providers can prevent these patients' injuries from becoming worse. Packaging and transporting the patients quickly and safely can be a challenge. If the injury is not identified during assessment and the patient is not properly immobilized, permanent disability or even fatality can result.

This course provides an overview of the anatomy of the spine and central nervous system and highlights the signs of spinal injury, assessment and medical care of patients with CNS injuries, and the use of short and long backboards.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Emergency Care for Lightning Strike Victims Advanced

The lifetime chance of being struck by lightning is 1 in 3000. Lightning is the second leading cause of weather related fatalities. This course explores how lightning strikes, where it strikes, and the effect it has on the body. It will challenge several lightning myths that delay critical patient care, define types of injuries, and explore tactics to increase rescuer safety.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Environmental Emergencies Advanced

Environmental emergencies include exposure to both heat and cold. Regulation of body temperature, which is an important physiological function, can be impaired under temperature extremes and result in heat or cold related illness. The key to effective management is recognizing the signs and symptoms and providing prompt emergency medical care.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Environmental Emergencies Basic

Environmental emergencies include exposure to both heat and cold. Regulation of body temperature, which is an important physiological function, can be impaired under temperature extremes and result in heat or cold related illness. The key to effective management is recognizing the signs and symptoms and providing prompt emergency medical care.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Femur Fractures

The femur, the thigh bone located between the knee and hip joints, is an extremely strong and large bone and is not usually fractured unless subjected to significant force, such as in a motor vehicle collision. Fracture of this bone can be extremely painful for the patient and may be life-threatening due to associated blood loss. Rapid splinting of the fracture and management of hemorrhage and shock are vital components of successful care of femoral fractures.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fetal Trauma from Motor Vehicle Collisions (ALS)

Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of maternal and fetal injury during pregnancy. This course reviews pregnancy anatomy and physiology, describes fetal injuries from trauma and the importance of assessing and stabilizing mom first.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Gunshot Wounds

EMS providers will be faced with the challenge of tending to victims of gunshot wounds at some point in their career. Injuries from guns pose a unique challenge for EMS personnel because of their severity as well as unpredictable scene atmospheres. Essentially, gunshot injuries are often devastating and require prompt action.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Head & Facial Injuries Advanced

The head and neck contain many structures critical to the airway, central nervous system, and sensation. Injuries to these areas can cause serious and permanent damage if improperly treated or missed in the patient assessment. This course reviews the pathophysiology and management of common injuries to the head, face, and neck, including injuries to the face, ears, eyes, and throat and soft tissue of the neck. Prompt identification and treatment of these injuries is crucial in reducing pain, preventing further injury, and minimizing permanent damage.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hip Fractures

Most hip fractures happen to elderly patients in their homes, and it is unlikely they can self-transport to the emergency department. Instead, they summon EMS. Falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths in elderly patients. This course reviews hip anatomy and physiology, in addition to causes of hip fractures, injury assessment, and treatment of a hip fracture.

This training course has a learning module with a 20-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hip Fractures Advanced

Most hip fractures happen to elderly patients in their homes, and it is unlikely they can self-transport to the emergency department. Instead, they summon EMS. Falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths in elderly patients. This course reviews hip anatomy and physiology, in addition to causes of hip fractures, injury assessment, and treatment of a hip fracture.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Injuries and Infections of the Eye

The human eye is an extremely fragile organ, and injury or infection of this organ can both cause extreme pain and lead to lifelong vision problems. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 2 million people go to the emergency department for eye injuries in the U.S., and eye trauma is the number one cause of blindness in individuals under 25 years of age. Fast, appropriate care for eye injuries can mean the difference between short-term pain and long-term disability. EMS providers must treat patients with infection or injury to the eye with care and with consideration of the patient's comfort. This course provides an overview of the eye's anatomy, as well as both traumatic injuries to the eye and common infections and diseases of the eye.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Kinematics of Trauma

Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death to Americans, causing 140,000 deaths ever year. It is estimated that one-third of these deaths are preventable. The EMT can help to prevent trauma-related deaths by predicting the type and degree of a patient's injury based on the mechanism of injury and forces involved in an accident. Basically, the EMT must consider the scene as well as the apparent condition of the patient.

This course will discuss the methods of predicting injury based on the type of motion and the forces involved in an accident. This method of predicting injury is referred to as "kinematics," or the physics of trauma. Some basic principles of physics as they relate to traumatic injury, as well as the mechanism of injury, will be discussed in the course.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Management of Cervical Spine Injuries on Athletics Part 2 Advanced

In 2001 guidelines from an inter-association task force of professional organizations representing emergency medical services, sports medicine, and physicians were released. The guidelines outlined standardized procedures for proper handling of athletes with C-spine injuries in the pre-hospital setting. This course explores the task force recommendations for equipment removal, patient movement, and patient packaging.

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to: Explore recommendations for treatment and transport of the spine injured athlete, describe tools and techniques for helmet facemask removal, and discuss proper technique for equipment removal and preparation for transport

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Musculoskeletal Injuries Advanced

Musculoskeletal injuries are one of the most common types of injuries encountered by the EMS provider. These injuries are largely non-life threatening in nature; however, some may be life threatening. Prompt identification and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries is crucial in reducing pain, preventing further injury, and minimizing permanent damage.

This course covers musculoskeletal injuries as they apply to fractures, strains, sprains, and dislocations, including types of injuries, patient treatment, and splinting procedures.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Musculoskeletal Injuries Basic

Musculoskeletal injuries are one of the most common types of injuries encountered by the EMT. These injuries are largely non-life threatening in nature; however, some may be life threatening. Prompt identification and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries is crucial in reducing pain, preventing further injury, and minimizing permanent damage.

This course covers musculoskeletal injuries as they apply to fractures, strains, sprains, and dislocations, including types of injuries, patient treatment, and splinting procedures.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Nose Bleeds

The nose is a gateway to airway. It assists in critical airway and breathing functions. In this course, learn about the structure of the nose, its functions, what can go wrong with the nose and treatments for nosebleeds.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Nose Bleeds Advanced

The nose is a gateway to airway. It assists in critical airway and breathing functions. In this course, learn about the structure of the nose, its functions, what can go wrong with the nose and treatments for nosebleeds.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pelvic Fractures Advanced

Pelvic fractures are serious injuries with potential for severe hemorrhage and exsanguination. Up to 4 liters of blood can be drained into the pelvic and retroperitoneal cavities in a pelvic fracture injury. Pelvic fracture patients also face a heightened risk of mortality from likely multisystem trauma due to the significant force required to cause such fractures and the likely significant mechanism of injury. In motor vehicle accidents, pelvic ring fractures are the third most frequent cause of mortality.

This course provides a general overview of pelvic fractures and discusses assessment strategies and patient management considerations. The course also surveys the various types of pelvic fractures that may be encountered and the anatomical and physiological impacts such fractures may have.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Recognition and Treatment of Foot Injuries Advanced

We use our feet in nearly every daily activity and subject our feet to continual abuse. The average person walks about 1,000 miles per year. However, because of improper foot wear, lack of conditioning, traumatic events, and overuse 43.1 million Americans have foot problems. This course discusses assessment and treatment of common foot injuries seen by prehospital providers.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Sepsis

Each year over 750,000 patients are diagnosed with severe sepsis in the United States. Although most common in the hospital, sepsis often strikes patients in the out-of-hospital setting. There are many reasons for the frequency increase—an aging population, increasing frequency of immunosuppressant diseases, and an increase of drug-resistant bacteria. This training discusses the physiology and treatment of sepsis.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Sepsis Advanced

Each year over 750,000 patients are diagnosed with severe sepsis in the United States. Although most common in the hospital, sepsis often strikes patients in the out-of-hospital setting. There are many reasons for the frequency increase—an aging population, increasing frequency of immunosuppressant diseases, and an increase of drug-resistant bacteria. This training discusses the physiology and treatment of sepsis.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Shock and Shock Management

In a very broad sense, shock is inadequate capillary perfusion. It must be recognized, however, that shock is not a singular event with a specific cause or treatment. It is a complex group of physiological abnormalities caused by a variety of disease states and injuries. In this course, learn about shock and shock management.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Spinal Cord Injuries

On average, there are between 12,000 to 20,000 new spinal cord injuries every year in the U.S., and these are a leading cause of paralysis and many other short- and long-term effects. Some of these injuries, however, are incurred during patient care and could be prevented. In fact, it is estimated that a quarter of all spinal cord injuries are caused by improper handling. A greater understanding of the risks of spinal cord injuries and the need for proper immobilization and patient handling techniques is important for reducing the frequency of such injuries.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Stroke Assessment & Treatment

Strokes kill more than 150,000 people per year making it the third leading cause of death. Unfortunately, less than half of stroke patients access EMS for help. In this course, learners will review stroke types, important assessment findings, and appropriate treatment.
This course includes the updated information on stroke assessment and treatment from the 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care. It also discusses the recently released Give Me 5 for Stroke public awareness campaign.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Stroke Assessment & Treatment Advanced

Strokes kill more than 150,000 people per year making it the third leading cause of death. Unfortunately, less than half of stroke patients access EMS for help. In this course, learners will review stroke types, important assessment findings, and appropriate treatment.

This course includes the updated information on stroke assessment and treatment from the 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care. It also discusses the recently released Give Me 5 for Stroke public awareness campaign.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Thoracic Emergencies Advanced

The thorax, or chest, is the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs. Because the chest contains these vital organs, almost all chest traumas can be life threatening! Understanding the mechanism of injury and relevant signs and symptoms of thoracic injuries is of paramount importance when dealing with the traumatized patient.

This course highlights the signs, symptoms, and emergency care of the most common traumatic injuries to the thorax.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Thoracic Emergencies Basic

The thorax, or chest, is the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs. Because the chest contains these vital organs, almost all chest traumas can be life-threatening! Understanding the mechanism of injury and relevant signs and symptoms of thoracic injuries is of paramount importance when dealing with the traumatized patient.

This course highlights the signs, symptoms, and emergency care of the most common traumatic injuries to the thorax.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Traumatic Head and Brain Injuries Advanced

A traumatic injury to the head and/or brain can pose a serious threat to the patient. Appropriate care for traumatic head injuries must be commenced immediately, as the progression of these injuries can be very rapid. According to the CDC, 50,000 people die of traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year and at least 5.3 million Americans currently have a long-term or lifelong need for help in performing daily functions as a result of TBI. Appropriate and fast care for these types of injuries, however, can reduce the likelihood of death or permanent disability in these patients.

It is imperative that the EMS provider understand the basic anatomy of the head and brain, the pathophysiology of common head and brain injuries, and the steps to assess and care for these injuries in the prehospital environment. This course does not discuss injuries to the face and neck. For information regarding these injuries, please see the EMS Head and Facial Injuries Advanced course.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Traumatic Injury During Pregnancy

Trauma is always a serious matter for EMS responders; however, it is even more so when it comes to treating a pregnant patient. Anatomical and physiological changes of pregnancy greatly impact a pregnant woman’s response to traumatic injury. When responding to a pregnant patient who has suffered trauma, EMTs must modify assessment, treatment considerations, and transportation strategies.

This course discusses the different aspects of managing trauma injuries of pregnant patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Understanding and Restraining Patients with Excited Delirium

Excited delirium is a severe medical problem. Patient restraint, especially sudden death while restrained, is a “hot topic” in healthcare and EMS. Learn to recognize excited delirium and principles for verbal, physical and chemical restraint for agitated excited patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Understanding and Restraining Patients with Excited Delirium Advanced

Excited delirium is a severe medical problem. Patient restraint, especially sudden death while restrained, is a “hot topic” in healthcare and EMS. Learn to recognize excited delirium and principles for verbal, physical and chemical restraint for agitated excited patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Unstable Pelvic Fractures

Patients with unstable pelvic fractures are at a high risk of fatality from major blood loss. Understanding the anatomy of the pelvis and surrounding structures and the types of pelvic fractures that can occur helps the EMT recognize and provide in-field stabilization of a pelvic fracture. There are several methods to stabilize a fractured pelvis, but all share the goal of circumferential compression and reduction.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

Assessment and Treatment of Submersion Injuries

Emergency responders are called to assist with dangerous water rescue situations, such as a child that has fallen through the ice. But most submersion injuries occur a short distance from safety, in places like a bathtub or home swimming pool. This presentation focuses on the submersion injuries of drowning and near drowning. In this course learn causes, extrication considerations, and assessment and treatment of submersion injuries.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Assessment and Treatment of Submersion Injuries Advanced

Emergency responders are called to assist with dangerous water rescue situations, such as a child that has fallen through the ice. But most submersion injuries occur a short distance from safety, in places like a bathtub or home swimming pool. This presentation focuses on the submersion injuries of drowning and near drowning. In this course learn causes, extrication considerations, and assessment and treatment of submersion injuries.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Assessment, Treatment and Transport of Morbidly Obese Patients

Sixty-four percent of Americans are overweight or obese. One in 80 men weighs more than 300 pounds and one in 200 women weighs more than 300 pounds. Obesity the second leading cause of preventable death kills more than 300,000 Americans per year. This presentation defines overweight, obesity, and morbid obesity and strategies to assess, treat, and transport these patients with respect while maintaining the standard of care and protecting prehospital personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Assessment, Treatment and Transport of Morbidly Obese Patients Advanced

Sixty-four percent of Americans are overweight or obese. One in 80 men weighs more than 300 pounds and one in 200 women weighs more than 300 pounds. Obesity the second leading cause of preventable death kills more than 300,000 Americans per year. This presentation defines overweight, obesity, and morbid obesity and strategies to assess, treat, and transport these patients with respect while maintaining the standard of care and protecting prehospital personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Bariatric Patients

Nearly 70% of American adults are overweight and over one-third are obese, and current trends suggest these numbers are likely to increase. In the past three decades, obesity has more than tripled among adolescents. This means EMT providers will encounter an increasingly higher incidence of emergency runs involving bariatric patients. EMS personnel need to be prepared to respond to such incidents, to be able to recognize and manage the high number of known comorbidities of obesity, and to mitigate the risks of injury posed by moving and transporting such patients.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Child Abuse: An EMS Professionals Role & Responsibilities

In this course the role of EMS professional related to assessing, suspecting, and reporting child abuse is reviewed. The course explains several types of abuse and neglect and discusses general principles for treatment and assessment. The course concludes with a short discussion of prevention programs. Since the course focuses on general principles it is important to know and understand specific state or local guidelines applicable to your practice as an EMT or paramedic.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Child Abuse: An EMS Professionals Role & Responsibilities Advanced

Properly caring for children is a key aspect of emergency response. Sometimes, you'll find that you're role as a typical emergency responder becomes blurred when the child's welfare comes into account. When you think a child you are responding to may be a victim of child abuse, how do you address your concerns while remaining a patient advocate? How can you be fair and impartial while also providing proper care? This course will describe the EMS professional's role related to possible child abuse, explain types of abuse and syndromes, and discuss assessment and management of a pediatric patient who has been abused while also examining child abuse programs.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

General Science Advanced

The study of the human body cannot be accomplished without a discussion of the most basic level of organization, that of individual atoms and molecules. The characteristics of everything in the universe are determined by atoms and the way they interact with each other. This course will help you to understand the general science needed to begin study of human anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Geriatric Assessment Challenges

More than 12% of the US population is over age 65 and that number is expected to rise to 25% by the year 2050. Many seniors live with at least one chronic medical condition. This course will review the factors that complicate geriatric patient assessment and techniques to conduct efficient geriatric patient interviews.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Geriatric Behavioral Emergencies

Understanding geriatric behavioral emergencies is an important aspect of an EMS provider's training. These incidents are often dismissed as normal age-related changes in patients, and therefore, essential care is not initially provided. It is essential that providers have a thorough knowledge base of geriatric behavioral emergencies, so they can recognize these conditions and treat their patients accordingly.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Geriatric Emergencies Advanced

Geriatrics is the treatment and study of the aged, generally people older than 65. There are many unique challenges for the EMS provider caring for a geriatric patient. As people age, many physiological and psychological changes occur. In fact, people become less and less alike as they age. These changes, combined with pre-existing medical conditions, the use of many different medications, and social issues unique to the elderly, require modified assessment and treatment techniques.

The purpose of this lesson is to highlight the most common physiological changes and how these changes impact your assessment and treatment of common medical conditions and traumatic injuries.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Geriatric Emergencies Basic

Geriatrics is the treatment and study of the aged, generally people older than 65. There are many unique challenges in caring for a geriatric patient. As people age, many physiological and psychological changes occur. These changes, combined with pre-existing medical conditions, the use of many different medications, and social issues unique to the elderly, require modified assessment and treatment techniques.

The purpose of this course is to highlight the most common physiological changes and how these changes impact your assessment and treatment of common medical conditions and traumatic injuries.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Geriatric Hip Injuries

Hip injuries can lead to life-threatening complications for elderly patients, who can have numerous underlying or subsequent conditions that increase their risk of severe injury and even fatality. One out of five hip fracture patients dies within a year of their injury.

The most common reason for hip injury due to a fall is osteoporosis, a disease that weakens bone structure. Because of underlying conditions like this, a fall involving a geriatric patient has the potential to cause more extensive injury and health complications than in younger patients. Among those age 65 and older, falls are the leading cause of injury death.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hypothermia Assessment and Treatment

Hypothermia is not just an “up north—cold and snow” problem. Hypothermia can onset quickly from recreational exposure, trauma or can gradually worsen due to illness. Learn assessment guidelines to differentiate mild and severe hypothermia. Also, the course reviews treatment guidelines for mild hypothermia and specific ALS and BLS considerations for severe hypothermia.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hypothermia Assessment and Treatment Advanced

Hypothermia is not just an “up north—cold and snow” problem. Hypothermia can onset quickly from recreational exposure, trauma or can gradually worsen due to illness. Learn assessment guidelines to differentiate mild and severe hypothermia. Also, the course reviews treatment guidelines for mild hypothermia and specific ALS and BLS considerations for severe hypothermia.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Managing Chronic Care Patients

Emergencies involving chronic care patients can be particularly stressful for patients and their caregivers. Such patients often have extensive medical histories, many have weakened immunological resistance to disease and infection, and others are frail due to the onset of age. Nearly 70% of chronic care patients are aged 65 or older. Additionally, as nearly half of all adults in the US have at least one chronic illness (2005), chronic care is likely to become even more common in the future.

This course provides a general overview of the issues and considerations relevant to managing chronic care patients. Topics discussed include the various kinds of medical devices that may be encountered, the specific complications most commonly found in such patients, and the unique assessment and management strategies involved in caring for chronic care patients.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Neonatology Advanced

Neonatology is the study and care of the newborn, or neonate, patient. After a woman gives birth, you must care for two patients-the mother and her newborn child. The newborn has several special needs, the most important of which are protection of the airway and support of ventilations.

This course reviews the techniques for assessing the newborn patient, the proper care of a distressed newborn, and the field management of complications common at birth.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Obstetrical Emergencies Advanced

You may encounter a number of pregnancy-related complications in the field. Some are minor, but some may be serious and life-threatening. While childbirth normally occurs in a hospital, it does occur in the prehospital setting on rare occasions. Because of the infrequency, taking care of an anxious mother and newborn infant is a stressful emergency call for the EMT. Knowledge and practice can decrease stress and lead to better mother and child care.

The goal of this course is to provide you the information you need to understand and begin management of most common obstetrical and gynecological emergencies.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Obstetrical Emergencies Basic

Gynecology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the female reproductive system. Obstetrics is the branch of medicine that deals specifically with the care of women during pregnancy. Although gynecological and obstetrical emergencies are not the most common types of emergencies you will encounter, when you are called to one, it will require fast, effective, and professional care.

Childbirth usually occurs in the hospital setting, but you may have to assist with the delivery of an infant in the prehospital setting. You may also encounter pregnancy-related emergencies, both major and minor. During your initial assessment, an expectant mother’s condition can appear to be minor, but in mere seconds it can turn life-threatening. Therefore, understanding the anatomy and physiology of the female reproduction system and the body’s changes during pregnancy will help you best care for a patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Patient Abuse and Assault

The prevalence of abuse and assault coupled with the deep physical and psychological impacts of such incidents on victims and their loved ones makes it imperative that emergency responders be familiar with the unique patient care considerations and characteristics inherent in these situations. Topics covered in the course include the cyclical nature of abuse, the legal aspects of sexual assault cases, and the community resources available for helping victims beyond the prehospital environment.

This course aims to equip paramedics to respond professionally, caringly, and effectively to incidences of abuse and assault, including partner abuse, elder abuse, child abuse, and sexual assaults involving adults and/or children.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Patients with Special Challenges

When called to the scene of an emergency, you may encounter patients with a variety of special challenges. From physical impairments to mental challenges to pathological conditions, these patients vary from the norm and may require special considerations for communications, care, and transport. Being aware of these challenges will ensure you treat these patients in a professional, courteous manner and provide the best possible care.

The course highlights the special needs of patients with hearing impairments, visual impairments, speech impairments, obesity, paraplegia/quadriplegia, mental illness, developmental disabilities, arthritis, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, poliomyelitis, spina bifida, and patients with a previous head injury.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Airway Management

Airway management is a critical skill for EMS personnel. A patient without a patent airway will suffer hypoxia, which can cause permanent brain damage after four minutes. After ten minutes, the patient has only a one percent chance of survival.

Respiratory difficulties are among the most common types of pediatric emergencies in many EMS systems. Because of the frequency and severity of respiratory incidents with pediatric patients, EMS personnel need to keep their skills sharp and remain prepared to provide immediate and effective interventions.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Airway Management Advanced

Airway management is a critical skill for EMS personnel. A patient without a patent airway will suffer hypoxia, which can cause permanent brain damage after four minutes. After ten minutes, the patient has only a one percent chance of survival.

Respiratory difficulties are among the most common types of pediatric emergencies in many EMS systems. Because of the frequency and severity of respiratory incidents with pediatric patients, EMS personnel need to keep their skills sharp and remain prepared to provide immediate and effective interventions.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pediatric Assessment Part 1

While most EMS calls are for adults, it’s important to properly identify pediatric patient traits, anatomy and physiology. This course helps EMS personnel understand causes of pediatric injury and death, traits of pediatric patient age groups, and important differences in pediatric anatomy to help keep pediatric patient assessment skills sharp.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Assessment Part 2

Pediatric patients cause anxiety for many prehospital care providers. An excellent assessment is the key to understanding the patient’s problems and reducing anxiety. In this course, explore pediatric patient assessment techniques, principles for immobilizing pediatric patients, and issues in pediatric patient transport.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Burns Advanced

Burns are the second-leading cause of death among children between 1 and 14. Since 2001, over 100,000 children are treated for burn injuries each year on average. Pediatric burn patients often have unique mechanisms of injury and have different physiological needs than adults, so a one-size-fits-all approach can do more harm than good. EMS providers must adapt their interventions to the unique needs of these particularly vulnerable patients.

This course reviews pediatric patient burn assessment and management strategies, highlighting the differences between pediatric and adult patients. The course discusses the physiological effects of burn injuries on children and provides guidelines for making patient assessment, management, and transport decisions.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Advanced

Watch Video
Pediatric cardiac arrest is one of the most serious and stressful incidents EMS providers face. Care for victims of cardiac arrest must be provided immediately because their window of survival is very limited. During cardiac arrest, the pumping action of the heart stops, and the body’s cells begin to die within 4-6 minutes of onset. Bystanders trained in CPR and EMS providers must act quickly to improve a patient’s chances of survival from cardiac arrest.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pediatric Cardiac Emergencies Advanced

A congenital heart defect is an abnormality in any part of the heart that is present at birth. This course introduces the causes of pediatric cardiac emergencies, reviews relevant anatomy and physiology, explains the assessment, and discusses the management of CHDs emergencies, as well as cardiac arrest in the pediatric patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Cardiac Emergencies Basic

A congenital heart defect is an abnormality in any part of the heart that is present at birth. This course introduces the causes of pediatric cardiac emergencies, reviews relevant anatomy and physiology, explains the assessment, and discusses the management of CHDs emergencies, as well as cardiac arrest in the pediatric patient.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Emergencies Advanced

Pediatric patients can cause anxiety for the prehospital care provider due to lack of experience dealing with this special population as well as a fear of failure. Infants and children are not just small adults. Their body size, differing developmental changes, and differing ranges of vital signs require that the EMS provider modify his approach accordingly.

This course will cover the key differences in pediatric patients and common emergencies EMS providers may face with this patient population.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pediatric Emergencies Basic

Infant and child patients can cause anxiety for the prehospital care provider due to lack of experience dealing with this special population as well as a fear of failure. Infants and children are not just small adults. Their body size, differing developmental changes, and differing ranges of vital signs require that the EMS provider modify his approach accordingly.

In addition, the EMS provider must recognize that the child must be cared for in the presence of the family, which can cause additional challenges for the emergency medical care provider. A calm, professional, and reassuring EMS provider can help to minimize the psychological impact of the transport on the parent and the child.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pediatric Fever for the EMT

Fever is a symptom of an illness but concerns about fever cause inaction and mistreatment by parents and healthcare providers alike. In this course, learn the definition and causes of fever, as well as techniques to assess and treat fever in the pediatric patient population.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Fever for the Paramedic Advanced

Fever is a symptom of an illness but concerns about fever cause inaction and mistreatment by parents and healthcare providers alike. In this course, learn the definition and causes of fever, as well as techniques to assess and treat fever in the pediatric patient population.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Fluid and Airways Advanced

Less than 10% of ambulance calls are for pediatric patients and only a small percentage of those pediatric patients have an immediate life-threatening problem. During the initial assessment, it’s crucial to quickly identify airway, breathing, and circulation problems. In this course, learn causes of fluid depletion, fluid resuscitation methods, causes of respiratory system compromise and pediatric airway management techniques.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Ingestions Advanced

In this video training program paramedic, pediatric patient expert, and educator Kyle David Bates teaches pediatric assessment principles, common accident medication ingestions and their symptoms, and treatment priorities for a child with a toxic ingestion. The video includes several cases and discussion with attendees of the live presentation.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies: Lower Airway for the Paramedic Advanced

Although pediatric patients typically make up only about ten percent of all EMS calls, breathing difficulty is a common chief complaint. Calls involving respiratory difficulty are often anxiety producing, but a younger patient in distress can create an even higher level of apprehension. This course explores the causes of, as well as the assessments and treatments for, pediatric respiratory emergencies in the lower airway.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies: Upper Airway for the EMT

Although pediatric patients typically make up only about ten percent of all EMS calls, breathing difficulty is a common chief complaint. Calls involving respiratory difficulty are often anxiety producing, but a younger patient in distress can create an even higher level of apprehension. This course explores the causes of, as well as the assessments and treatments for pediatric respiratory emergencies in the upper airway.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies: Upper Airway for the Paramedic Advanced

Although pediatric patients typically make up only about ten percent of all EMS calls, breathing difficulty is a common chief complaint. Calls involving respiratory difficulty are often anxiety producing, but a younger patient in distress can create an even higher level of apprehension. This course explores the causes of, as well as the assessments and treatments for pediatric respiratory emergencies in the upper airway.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pediatric Shock Advanced

Pediatric shock is a life-threatening condition. In fact, each year it accounts for about 20 million deaths of infants and children worldwide.

Delays in recognizing the type of shock a child is suffering from and beginning the proper treatment will result in a rapid progression from compensated reversible shock to irreversible shock, which ends in organ failure and eventually death. The earlier shock is recognized, and therapy is started, the better the child's chance of survival will be.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Pediatric Trauma Advanced

Traumatic injury is the leading cause of death in young children and adolescents. Children have unique medical needs. Therefore, it is essential that responders have a thorough understanding of pediatric traumatic injuries and the knowledge to manage these incidents.

This two-hour course discusses the types of pediatric trauma incidents and management methods of each.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Sports Medicine for EMS

EMS is often asked to standby at or respond to injured or ill athletes that are receiving care from athletic trainers. Because of the different role they play, athletic trainers have a different philosophical approach to injury and illness than EMS providers. Understanding this difference can make interfacing with them easier and more importantly improves patient care. Learn about those philosophical differences, pre- planning considerations, and athletic trainer qualifications in part one of this two-part course.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the unexpected and sudden death of an apparently normal and seemingly healthy infant that occurs during sleep. It is considered one of the leading causes of death in the United States in infants under one year of age as it is responsible for more than 7000 deaths a year. Responding to a SIDS call can be both professionally and emotionally tolling on an EMS provider as not much can be done in terms of patient care and management. Providers will most likely be faced with consoling the parent or other caregiver as well as assessing and recording information about the death scene.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)


OPERATIONS

Back Injury Prevention

Providing emergency medical care is a physically demanding career. Lifting and moving patients, rescuing patients in awkward and dangerous positions, and carrying heavy medical equipment are all parts of the job that put you at risk for back injuries. Since once a back is injured, it is three to five times more likely to experience subsequent injury, this training course focuses on the knowledge and skills you need to prevent a back injury. Remember, your health and safety should be your primary concern on the job. Keeping this focus will ensure you are physically fit to continue in your rewarding career for years to come. This training course has 8 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Confined-Space Entry

Your most important concern when approaching the scene of an emergency is safety - for you, your crew members, and others on the scene. There are a variety of hazards you may encounter, including crash scenes, hazardous materials, crime scenes, or unstable surfaces. This training course is focused on the hazards associated with confined space entry. Confined spaces may seem harmless but can be extremely dangerous, even fatal. According to NIOSH, 60% of all fatalities associated with confined spaces are would-be rescuers. Recognizing confined spaces and the hazards that may be encountered in them is the first step in avoiding serious injury and death.

This course provides awareness level training for activities related to confined space entry. It is imperative that emergency medical service personnel recognize the potential hazards that may be encountered while working in and around confined spaces and to understand safe work procedures that will promote safe and efficient operations in confined spaces. Additional training at your job site is recommended to gain a better understanding of the confined space procedures in your organization. This training course has 14 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Crime Scene Awareness

EMS providers can be affected by violence and crimes at any point in their careers. Therefore, it is essential that providers are always conscious of dangerous situations and have a complete understanding of how to handle them. If you are not aware of dangerous situations or how to respond to patients at a crime scene, you risk becoming a victim or hostage of a violent situation. And, not only does this put you at risk, but you also risk endangering your crew.

This course discusses crime scene awareness, and it offers suggestions on how to approach and manage scenes with potential violence. Always follow your local protocols where any discrepancy between the course content and your local protocols exist. It is essential to the well-being of a responder to be aware of how to proceed in dangerous situations and at crime scenes.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Driving Safety

Roadways are a dangerous place for EMS personnel. According to the NFPA, in 2005 there were an estimated 15,885 collisions involving fire department emergency vehicles while departments were responding to or returning from incidents. And many more are injured annually from other emergency vehicle related accidents as well. Operating an emergency vehicle is a responsibility you should take seriously to minimize the risk of injury and death to yourself and others, as well as damage to expensive equipment. Since hands-on experience is a key element to operating an emergency vehicle safely, it is recommended that you attend an approved driving course if you are the driver of an emergency vehicle.

This training course reviews the principles of safe driving and highlights the risks you may encounter on the road as a driver and a passenger in an emergency vehicle and can help ensure you and your co- workers arrive safely on the scene.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Emergency Response to Terrorism (Modules 1-4)

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This Introductory Guide for First Responders is essential for those employees who may be among the first to arrive at an incident of suspicious origin. It is intended to be a general introduction to the basic concepts for first-responder awareness at the scene of a potential terrorist incident.
NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize retention of the course material, all four modules must be completed within 365 days of starting the course to receive a certificate of completion.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire & EMS Grant Writing

Funding is critical to Fire and EMS operations. Equipment, staffing, training all require funding, and the level they require can increase from year to year. This can be challenging when city, state, and other parent organization budgets are already strapped for cash or cutting back in difficult economic times. Yet without maintaining adequate funding, operations are less effective, the community is under served, and lives are put at risk--both those of personnel and of members of the community.

For these reasons, grant writing is an important skill to master. Skills such as research, organization, attention to detail, clear communication, and persistence are all key factors in successfully applying for, winning, and using grant assistance.

This course aims to educate Fire and EMS personnel on the skills and tasks necessary for successful grant writing, from the beginning stages of needs assessment and grant research to procuring resources with the allocated grant funds. Key emphasis is placed on federal grants and strategies are proposed for writing grants that successfully reach panel review.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

First Responder Operations Level Refresher (Modules 1-4)

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This course is designed to be a refresher for the Operations Level Responder to Hazardous Materials Incidents, meeting the requirements of NFPA 472 and 29 CFR 1910.120(q). The course is divided into four modules. Each module should take approximately two hours to complete.

The first module covers how to survey a hazmat spill or incident; how to collect hazard and response information with MSDSs, labels, and markings; and how to identify the various transport containers and storage tanks used for hazardous materials.

The second module covers the chemical and physical properties of materials and their impact on storage and transport containers; response objectives, including how to assess the risk to a responder for each hazard class; and how to determine the suitability of SCBA and personal protective equipment.

The third module covers the principles of site management, how to establish and enforce control zones, and tactics for emergency decontamination. It will discuss common types of releases and how to deal with them, and how to conduct defensive operations such as damming and diking and air monitoring.

The fourth module covers incident management systems and the first responder's role in a response plan. It will also cover the potential for terrorist attacks, typical agents used in a terrorist event, and the appropriate response tactics.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each

Incident Command System

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The Incident Command System (ICS) has been designed, developed, and deployed for use by emergency management professionals and responder agencies. ICS is designed to create effective and efficient management of complex and emergency events with a simple, flexible, and adaptable system to organize, control, and direct response agencies and responders.

ICS utilizes a standardized approach to managing emergencies and complex events which has withstood the test of time. It is used both nationally and internationally and has been mandated by the U.S. Federal Government through the National Incident Management System (NIMS) at all levels of government, including public, private, and non-governmental organizations.

ICS is normally presented as an overarching system that should be used for effective emergency management. Any department that could be involved in responding to a mass-casualty and/or multiple agency response would benefit from this course.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Introduction to Hazardous Materials

Emergency medical service personnel face many risks and difficult tasks when dealing with patients involved in hazardous materials incidents. Therefore, it is essential that all personnel who come in contact with patients have a general awareness of the issues and concerns in dealing with hazardous materials incidents. This course is designed to prepare EMS personnel to understand hazardous materials terminology, basic safety strategies, the role of the EMS provider, specialized hazmat personal protective equipment, and the decontamination process.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Managing Multiple Casualty Incidents

As an EMS provider, you will respond to emergencies that require the involvement and cooperation of a large number of EMS and other specialized personnel. Such incidents may involve hazardous materials or the challenge of multiple patients. In these situations, you must recognize the need for additional resources and make appropriate notifications to an emergency communication center while maintaining a focus on the protecting yourself at all times.

Most communities have detailed plans for such emergencies. Your responsibility is to be familiar with those plans, the roles EMS providers, fire, law enforcement, and other agencies play, and your responsibilities when responding to this kind of emergency.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Medical Extrication & Rescue

Rescue and extrication operations, especially those relating to traffic incidents, represent a large number of EMS calls. These calls are often not only time-consuming but can be extremely technical, stressful and time-sensitive. Rescuers must have the skills to remain calm while determining the best method of rescuing the patient and subsequently executing their plan. This course will discuss the phases of a rescue operation, the hazards involved with the types of rescue operations, and the strategies for a successful operation.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Patient Care Report Essentials

The art of constructing an organized, coherent patient care report is as important in providing appropriate care as learning to perform effective CPR. It is important that it clearly contain all the information you want to communicate. By following 13 essentials described in this course, any EMS provider can improve the quality of their documentation.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Patient Care Report Essentials Advanced

The art of constructing an organized, coherent patient care report is as important in providing appropriate care as learning to perform effective CPR. It is important that it clearly contain all the information you want to communicate. By following 13 essentials described in this course, any EMS provider can improve the quality of their documentation.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Response to Mass Casualty Incidents

This course explores the ins and outs of EMS response to a mass casualty incident. Explore how EMS personnel can assess and transport a large number of patients by implementing incident command and using a triage system.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Response to Mass Casualty Incidents Advanced

This course explores the ins and outs of EMS response to a mass casualty incident. Learners taking this course will understand EMS roles in MCI response, explain simple triage and rapid treatment and be able to practice response skills. Discover how EMS personnel can assess and transport a large number of patients by implementing incident command and using a triage system.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Right to Know (Hazard Communication)

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Practical suggestions on how to implement the Hazard Communications Standard for the public sector, how to determine hazard classifications, how to interpret a Material Safety Data Sheet and procedures of Hazard Communications as presented in OSHA regulation 29 CFR 1910.1200 or 29CFR 1926.59. Contains three interactive scenarios, reference materials, case studies and hazardous communications forms.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Weapons of Mass Destruction - An Intro to WMD Agents

Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the Centers for Disease Control in recommended that health care professionals – including emergency responders – watch for any unusual disease patterns or symptoms that would suggest the intentional release of infectious biological, chemical, or radioactive agents by either foreign or domestic terrorists. This course is an introduction to WMD agents.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)