Technology with a Purpose
Menu
 
 
 

Firefighter Courses

Download Catalog


Available Courses

TargetSolutions features more than 450 hours of training for fire departments. Courses are based on the NFPA codes and standards, including NFPA 1001, NFPA 1021 and the NFPA 1500 Series. Courses also cover wildland fire, response to terrorism, and much more.


NFPA 1001 SERIES | FIREFIGHTER I & II

TargetSolutions has a complete library of Firefighter I & II awareness and refresher level courses based on NFPA codes and standards.

Building Construction

A solid knowledge of the fundamentals of building construction is crucial to the proper understanding of firefighting. An understanding of building construction will also serve to significantly reduce risks that may be incurred while fighting fires. A lack of consideration for the construction characteristics of a building can lead to deadly error during fire suppression.Properly informed firefighters are less likely to perform actions which endanger themselves, others, or the long-term stability of any building affected by a fire. This course will cover the basic elements of building construction and related hazards.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Behavior

Watch Video

To safely and effectively manage fire, firefighters must understand the science behind how fires start, how fires spread, and how fires can be extinguished. This information provides the basis for helping firefighters interpret what they encounter on the scene of a fire and select the proper tactics to safely fight a fire.

This course reviews the fundamentals of fire behavior, including the fire tetrahedron, types of fuel, products of combustion, and the phases of fire development. Specifically, this course focuses on fire behavior in structure fires. This course has 5 learning modules and a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Fire Control

Fire control is a task in which all a firefighter’s training, experience, and skills are put to the test. To a greater extent than any of a firefighter’s many other job responsibilities, the task of fire control imposes extreme demands squarely on the shoulders of every responding firefighter, requiring each crewmember to contribute to the department’s overall knockdown efforts with selflessness, professionalism, and efficiency. In this game, errors can be costly. Lives and property will be lost or saved depending on the success of the department’s combined efforts in fire control.

This course focuses on the tactical side of fire suppression. Topics include an introduction to fire control and the basics of fire extinguishment, treatment of general distinctions between fire types, general background information on fire control followed by specific application to structural fire scenarios including single and multistory buildings. Material is also provided on working with fire control devices pre-installed in buildings. Primary focus is devoted to structural fires, although non-structural fires are also covered in their own lesson.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Department Communications

This course focuses on the various tasks involving communication in the fire service. Beginning with a discussion of the importance of a communications plan and the functions of various communications hardware components, the course incorporates topics such as the communicative roles and responsibilities of personnel, especially dispatchers, and communications at fireground. Information about recordkeeping and interfacing with public agencies and media rounds out the discussion.

The course aims to impress upon personnel the importance of effective communication and enhance their communicative ability.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Detection, Alarm & Suppression Systems

This course emphasizes the importance of fire protection systems as preliminary fire control agents. Firefighters are encouraged to see these systems as allies in their firefighting task. Course topics range from practical concerns such as how fire detection and alarm systems operate to technical discussion on what factors distinguish the different kinds of detection system devices.

The course concludes by reinforcing the importance of pre-planning and suggesting strategies for taking full advantage of the capabilities of installed fire protection systems.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Hose

The fire service is dependent upon the fire hose; without it, large-scale, modern firefighting would be impossible. Fire personnel must understand the standards that fire hose must meet and should ensure that fire hose is properly maintained to survive the rigors of firefighting. Fire personnel also need to possess a solid knowledge of the various types of fire hoses and hose couplings, basic hose lay procedures, the handling of hose lines, and service testing to ensure the integrity of the hose.

This course will provide an introduction to all of these aspects of fire hose for fire personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Prevention and Public Education

Watch Video
Public education is a large part of fire service. As education and prevention is emphasized within a particular jurisdiction, the occurrence of fires generally decreases as the public is better equipped to work with the department to prevent fires.

Firefighters increase community awareness of fire safety in a number of ways. They conduct fire safety surveys, which serve to identify areas of particular risk and enable agencies to work with the public to mitigate the dangers. They may also create education materials for distribution in the community, teach classes, and give tours of the fire station. A fire department can maximize safety and prevention in its jurisdiction by taking an active role in public education and fire prevention and understanding the critical role played by its interaction with the public.

This course will provide a basic overview of some of the most commonly encountered fire hazards and the methods fire departments can use to raise public awareness of fire safety and prevention.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Streams

The majority of fires are extinguished using water or some other substance delivered under pressure. In fact, the vast majority of training and skills that a firefighter might be called upon to deliver depend upon the successful use and deployment of fire streams.

This course will examine the various types of fire stream and how they are deployed: Which hardware is used to produce effective fire streams? Which stream is appropriate for a particular type of fire or area? What concerns besides extinguishing the fire as quickly as possible must be considered? Although this course does not substitute for practical training, the concepts and ideas covered here can help you succeed in your fire organization career.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Firefighter Orientation and Safety

Firefighting is an inherently hazardous occupation. Each year, firefighters are killed or injured in the line of duty. It is the responsibility of every firefighter to maintain the basic skills and knowledge required to perform safely as team members of a fire department during emergency operations.

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the organizational structures in place to ensure a safe, organized emergency response, as well as general safety precautions for working on the fire apparatus, around the fire station, and on the scene of an emergency.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment

Firefighter clothing employs two strategies for protecting fire fighters from heat. First, it uses air to insulate the body. Second, clothing is made of heat-resistant materials. Wearing the right protective equipment can make the difference between life and death. For this reason, it is imperative that fire fighters regularly receive refresher training on PPE.

This course reviews the various types of PPE available to fire department personnel as well as their uses, limitations, and regulatory compliance. The course is not intended to substitute for hands-on training with PPE. Such training must be offered by the department in order to fully comply with OSHA.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Firefighting Foams

Foam is widely considered the best fire suppression/firefighting agent for class B fires and is increasingly used with a high degree of effectiveness for fighting class A fires as well. Its ability to smother fuels and provide a protection barrier for firefighters are unmatched. While the effectiveness of foams has received increasing recognition, misunderstandings about foam persist and departments continue to highlight the need for training in this area.

This course provides an overview of the effectiveness of foams, reviews the various types of foams available, and describes how foams work. Discussion also focuses on distinguishing between class A and B foams, properly proportioning foam solutions, and matching foam types with the appropriate nozzle or generator. Tactical application strategies and troubleshooting tips are presented as well as the various potential hazards for personnel to keep in mind when using foam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


Forcible Entry into a Structure

Forcible entry is the act of entering a structure using destructive means. During the course of a firefighter’s duties, situations often arise that require forcible entry into a structure. Applying the techniques and strategies of forcible entry can help save lives, minimize damage to property, and result in better public relations.This course covers the knowledge and skills necessary to perform forcible entry efficiently and safely. The content includes the definition of forcible entry and why it is used, how to select the appropriate location to enter, basic considerations for entry, and how to care for forcible entry tools.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Ground Ladders

Watch Video
Ladders are a vital component on the fire ground and during rescue operations. Fire department personnel must be knowledgeable in the design, characteristics, and proper use of fire department ladders.

This course highlights the types of ladders used in fire operations, how to maintain those ladders, and how to safely carry and place ladders. Fireground safety best practices are reviewed, as well as the rationale behind ladder failure due to metal fatigue and heat exposure.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Loss Control

This course discusses loss control as a key element in all fire service operations. It explains the need for salvage operations planning and how to conduct salvage operations. The various methods of using storage covers are also discussed along with ways to contain smoke and water damage. In addition to salvage operations, overhaul is also discussed as a primary means of loss control. Finally, and of critical importance in this course, particular emphasis is devoted to meeting the needs of fire victims.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Portable Extinguishers

Portable fire extinguishers are an important early intervention tool for attacking small fires. When used effectively, they can prevent a fire from growing out of control, which limits the damages and risks involved. They can also be used in areas inaccessible to hoses, such as when attacking wildland fires. It is most important to know what kind of extinguisher to use and how to use it properly. This knowledge is not only vital for firefighters’ own use, but for educating the general public as well.

This course reviews the guidelines of safe portable fire extinguisher operation and the unique considerations that distinguish each type of extinguisher. Various topics are covered including, fire classifications, fire extinguisher rating systems, extinguisher inspection, and proper care and maintenance.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Protection of Evidence of Fire Origin & Cause

Identifying the cause of a fire can help prevent fires in the future. For this reason, all fires should be investigated to determine the cause. Actions taken on the scene and at the beginning of an investigation can play an important role in the resolution of the case, so every effort must be made to ensure the physical evidence is protected.

This course covers basic fire investigation concepts, highlighting the role of first responders in the fire investigation process, including the identification of the signs of fire origin and cause and the examination of the methods used during fire extinguishment to ensure safety and preservation of evidence. In addition, the course reviews the legal requirements of the chain of evidence and fire investigation safety.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Rescue and Extrication

The majority of structure fires are put out before significant damage is done, but when the structure burns while people are trapped inside, firefighter must ensure that all areas are searched and all victims are located and removed. Searches must be conducted quickly and safely. Team integrity must be maintained, as well. Victims, and sometimes fellow firefighters, may have to be physically carried or dragged from the structure, often under adverse conditions. There is a wide array of tools and equipment available to facilitate search and rescue, but ultimately it is the firefighter’s training and experience that get the job done.

This course describes the best methods for conducting safe, effective, and efficient searches, use of the PASS system, and ways to identify and use key rescue and extrication tools and equipment.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus

Watch Video
Firefighters are often presented with environments that are dangerous to their lives and health. These Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) environments require the use of SCBA which provide the protection required to perform their assigned tasks.

This course focuses on understanding the legal requirements for SCBA, enforcing proper SCBA use, and understanding the conditions requiring such use. Federal and NFPA regulations are discussed as well as the importance of fit testing and safe usage. The course also describes various types of SCBA, how they can limit firefighter performance, and SCBA malfunctions and emergencies. Proper maintenance and inspection procedures are covered as well.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Vehicle Extrication

One of the most common situations encountered by today’s firefighters is automobile accidents. Automobile accidents are more commonly encountered than structure fires and have a much stronger tendency to put people at risk. Often, in the case of severe vehicle crashes, drivers or passengers may become entrapped in their cars, requiring fire personnel to perform vehicle extrication. To safely and efficiently free patients from their vehicles, firefighters must develop the skills necessary to coordinate with the police and EMS personnel.

Upon completion of this course, the student should better understand the firefighter’s role at special rescue operations, the hazards associated with these operations, and the types and uses of rescue tools involved with vehicle extrication. This course, like our other fire instruction courses, does not serve to substitute for practical, hands-on training. However, this course can provide a more comprehensive overview of vehicle extrication safety principles and what it means to ensure safety when dealing with vehicle systems which present known hazards.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Ventilation

Ventilation is the practice of opening parts of a structure to remove heat, smoke, and toxic gases, replacing these combustion products with cooler air. Proper ventilation leads to better visibility, lower temperatures, the reduced possibility of flashover, and reduces smoke damage to the affected property. Additional advantages of ventilation include the easier rescue of victims and increased ability to attack the fire. Ventilation requires full personal protective equipment and should not be attempted without qualified training. There are several different types of ventilation, and this course will examine each of those briefly.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Water Supply

Knowledge of water supply systems is an integral part of fire operations. Water is the primary extinguishing agent for fires, and for that reason firefighters must possess a solid knowledge of water supply. If water were to run out during an incident, firefighters could become trapped, injured, or killed. Firefighters must understand the principal aspects of water supply systems, how and where to access water, and what to do to prevent running out of water in an emergency.

This course provides fire personnel with a basic overview of water supply systems, fire hydrants, and rural water supply operations.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)



NFPA 1021

TargetSolutions has developed a complete line of company officer awareness and refresher level courses based on NFPA codes and standards.

Action Plan Implementation

An incident action plan sets the strategy that guides efforts in a response. Whether it is formulated mentally by the first-arriving officer or written down and revised as events unfold, the action plan is what transforms strategic goals into tactical objectives, which are used to assign tasks and resources to all units involved.

This course equips fire officers with the knowledge and ability to devise and implement an action plan for emergency responses. Various topics are discussed, including how to determine incident priorities and tactical objectives, how to break down an emergency scene into manageable parts, and how to allocate resources and assign tasks.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Assuming the Role of Company Officer

After having served as a member of a fire company for some years, you have become highly skilled at using the tools of your trade. You may feel that your skills and abilities should allow you the opportunity to become a company officer, and this course will help explore the differences between being a firefighter or driver/operator and being a company officer. The job requirements are very different, as are the skills required.

This course discusses the transition from firefighter to company officer and the knowledge and abilities that a fire officer must possess to be successful in the company officer role. This course has 10 lessons with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Budgeting

Budgeting is a fundamental administrative task in the fire service, and company officers are becoming increasingly more involved in the budgeting process. For this reason, it is important that company officers understand the process and the tasks they may be expected to perform. NFPA 1021, Standard for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications, requires that company officers be able to prepare a budget request to obtain the items needed to operate their stations and companies. As company officers become more familiar with the budgeting process they will be better prepared for the more significant budget responsibilities that come with higher rank.

This course provides an overview of the budgeting process. Various related topics are discussed including the budget cycle, the various kinds of budgets, and understanding revenues in the fire service. Additionally, the course covers strategies for coping with budgeting difficulties in times of economic hardship.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Community Awareness

Educating the public on fire safety issues is one of the most important tasks in the fire service to help minimize risks and prevent fire-related emergencies. Community awareness is a prerequisite for effective fire safety education. Knowing the needs and risks in the community can call attention to issues that should be addressed. Similarly, public relations is also a means of educating the public, informing them on the department's activities, and calling attention to safety issues.

This course focuses on providing proactive strategies of community engagement while balancing that with the need to remain always prepared to respond to opportunities to call attention to safety issues through community outreach programs, through the media, and on an individual basis. It also discusses skills and strategies for press releases and methods of responding to citizen's concerns and complaints.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Company-Level Training

Watch Video
This course will teach company officers how to successfully train at the company level. The course reviews the benefits of company-level training, the company officer’s training responsibilities, and how to assess a company’s training needs. Emphasis is given to developing a company-level training program.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Elements of Supervision and Management

Being a company officer, means shouldering leadership responsibilities both at the station house and at the fireground. Too often, officers may have strong managerial abilities at the station house and weak supervisory skills at the fireground, or vice versa. The challenge for the officer is to strive to demonstrate excellent leadership in every situation.

This course focuses on equipping officers with both the knowledge and the know how to effectively carryout their leadership in the two areas of supervision and management. To do this, the course reviews a broad range of topics, ranging from the theoretical--such as a brief historical overview of management theories up to the present--to the practical, such as basic principles of budgeting and administrative duties.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire and Life Safety Inspections

Safety inspections are among the most critical duties performed by fire personnel in the course of their careers. Properly performed, these inspections help identify risks before any incident occurs and help business owners and property managers prioritize any work needed to bring a building up to code or to reduce or eliminate evident risks. Fire personnel must be familiar with a set of general inspection techniques; they may also require specialized training depending on the local industrial base.

Fire inspections are performed in concert with property owners and managers. Inspectors should remember that some facilities possess security concerns outside their normal experience. In this case, they should defer to facility management as to the risks which might be present. In the absence of proper safety procedures, the investigator must use the full force of law available to force compliance. At first, some issues may not seem relevant enough to force compliance. For example, the mislabeling of a chemical may seem like a small issue; however, it has the potential to cause harm or even death. Because fire and life safety inspections are so effective at preventing major damage, injury and death, they are the mainstay of a jurisdiction's comprehensive safety management program.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Department Communications

Communication is critical to the achievement of a fire department's objectives. It is also a fundamental function of leadership. Fire officers are vital links in the chain of communication stretching from the fire chief to new recruits. If communication is ineffective then important information is lost, leading to misunderstandings and even mission failure.

This course provides an overview of the communications process with an emphasis on enhancing officers' communicative abilities and recognizing and avoiding barriers to effective communication. The course is primarily concerned with oral communication and includes discussion on topics such as understanding the various elements of the communication process, improving speaking and listening skills, and understanding the role of nonverbal cues.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Department Structure

It is important that all firefighters understand the structure of their departments or fire protection agencies. A lack of knowledge in this vital area can lead to misunderstanding, inefficiency, and worst of all, can complicate emergency operations. Firefighters must also have a solid understanding of the various kinds of fire protection agencies that exist and how their own departments may interact with other organizations under the Incident Command System.

This course reviews the various organizational structures of a fire department, both at the macro and micro levels. It also provides an overview of the unique mission, roles, and organizational principles of fire departments and identifies the distinctions between public and private fire protection agencies, career and volunteer firefighters, and line and staff personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Investigation

In addition to their other duties at fires, company officers are responsible for securing the scene of a fire and protecting possible evidence until the cause of the fire has been determined. In some departments, fire company officers are responsible for making the preliminary cause determination. These requirements dictate that company officers have a deep understanding of fire behavior, investigation techniques, and the importance of proper documentation.

This course discusses the company officer's responsibilities regarding fire cause determination, scene security, and evidence preservation. Also covered are the investigations of accidental, natural, and incendiary fires, as well as proper documentation procedures for the investigation. This course has 10 lessons with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Firefighter Safety and Health

Firefighting is an inherently hazardous occupation, but that does not imply that some of these hazards cannot be prevented or at least minimized. Countless injuries occur yearly that could have been prevented if greater attention had been paid beforehand to the risks involved. By taking responsibility for the safety and health of department members, fire officers can play an important role in reducing these risks.

This course provides a general overview of health and safety issues that confront members of the fire service. The course introduces current local, state and federal laws pertaining to occupational safety and health that apply to fire officers. It emphasizes the importance of identifying occupational hazards that exist--both actual and potential. Factors related to physical and mental fitness and basic health, such as basic knowledge of exercise physiology, good nutrition and stress management, are also reviewed.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Government Structure

Most fire departments are units of the local government, and as members of a government entity, fire officers need to recognize how their department fits into the broader structures of local, state, and federal governments. This enables officers to work together with the community and to see their individual concerns from the perspective of the best overall interest of the city, the state, and the nation.

This course provides an overview of federal, state, and local government structures, agencies, and functions with a focus on their relevance to the fire department. Of these, particular attention has been given to local governments and the importance of recognizing the fire department's place within them. The course also provides an overview of the different types of local governments a department may encounter, and the ways laws are made.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Incident Response Safety

Firefighting has been described as one of the nation's most hazardous occupations, and fire officers play an important role in helping themselves and other personnel minimize those hazards. On average, there are nearly 100 deaths per year in the fire service, and there are countless more injuries, both reported and unreported. While the number of deaths has been declining in recent years, there is still room for improvement, and many preventable risk factors need to be addressed.

This course provides a general overview of health and safety issues that confront members of the fire service when responding to various emergency incidents. The course surveys the types of general hazards that can be encountered due to environmental conditions or dangers present at the scene and provides an analysis of the hazards present in each type of emergency response. Safety precautions for each kind of response are proposed. The course also discusses the importance and function of a Rehabilitation Area.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Incident Scene Communications

The importance of clear and effective communication at the scene of an incident cannot be overstated. A miscommunication or lack of communication at either end of the communicative process, transmitting or receiving, can lead to costly setback or even failure in incident operations. In the high stakes environment of the fireground there is no room for communication breakdown.

This course focuses on conveying to firefighters the importance of clear and effective communication in incident responses. The various kinds of communication, the components that comprise a department's communications system, and the intrinsic relationship between ICS and communication are highlighted. In addition, six critical junctures of communication during incident operations are reviewed.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Incident Scene Management

How an incident scene is managed can determine the overall effectiveness of a department's response. Proper scene management can minimize firefighters' exposure to risk and maximize the efficiency of their interventions, whether they are aimed at life safety, incident stabilization, or property conservation.

This course provides an overview of the responsibilities and tasks associated with incident scene management. It discusses topics such as scene safety, performing size-up, and managing the various components of an incident.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Information Management

Information is a commodity intrinsic to nearly every activity in the fire service. Information is transmitted from instructor to students during training exercises. It is relayed from dispatch to officers in emergency incidents. Pre-incident plans, another type of information, are retrieved by the Incident Commander (IC) at the scene. Letters and press releases contain information that is often made available to the public through local government officials or the news media.

This course provides an overview of information management in the fire service. It reinforces the importance of effective information management and covers a range of topics, including principles of good writing, types of written communication, reporting, and record-keeping. Discussion is also devoted to the use of technology in the task of information management.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Labor Relations

Firefighters today enjoy much better working conditions than their early predecessors. While many of the improvements can be attributed to general societal progress, or to better equipment, more training, or increased attention to health and safety, organized labor has also played a significant role in many of the improvements. As firefighters recognize the valuable roles of both organized labor and management in the fire service, labor-management relations can improve and progress can be made in cooperating to serve the community well.

This course provides an overview of labor relations with an emphasis on practical solutions for maintaining positive relations between labor and management. Topics discussed include legislation on labor issues, types of labor actions, grievance procedures, and conflict resolution, including mediation and arbitration.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Leadership as a Group Influence

Watch Video
Leadership is essential to being an effective fire company officer. Leadership skills can be taught to anyone, and great leaders come in many forms. The goal of this course is to outline how to become a better leader in your fire company, no matter your experience, skill level, or perceptions of leadership.

This course teaches the importance of leadership in fire service, why leadership is critical to an effective company, and describes how leaders can create a better and more productive work environment. The various types and styles of power a leader can use will be explained, as will leadership theories and how they apply to fire service. This course also outlines effective leadership strategies for fire officers, explains the challenges of leading a group and how to overcome them.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Legal Responsibilities and Liabilities

A number of recent tragic incidents have served as a wake-up call to the need for focusing greater attention on legal issues in the fire service. Departments can be cited and fined by OSHA or other agencies for lack of training, documentation, or compliance with specific sections of the law.

This course focuses on the legislation and standards that affect firefighters and the ongoing mitigation efforts that should be in place in a fire department. Regulatory and standards compliance, thorough documentation, and ongoing training are emphasized in this course as forming the basis for protecting the fire department from liability.

The course provides general information on legal issues mainly concerned with Federal law. In many areas, State law may also be applicable. Departments should also provide training on applicable laws in their own States. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required for implementing liability reduction strategies in your department, seek the services of a competent legal professional who is aware of the unique issues faced by emergency fire and rescue personnel.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Pre-Incident Planning

Watch Video
Protecting a community from fires and other emergency incidents requires more than merely responding to the alarm. In fact, by then, sometimes it may be too late; much of the damage may already have been done. A more comprehensive solution is needed to provide adequate emergency management, one that can identify and address hazards so that in the event a response is needed, personnel will be fully prepared, being already familiar and trained to meet the unique needs of the property at hand.

This course reviews the concept of pre-incident planning and reiterates the importance of conducting such planning in a thorough and effective manner. The primary elements of pre-incident planning are discussed, including gathering information (i.e., performing the property survey), recording that information, and using that information effectively, both in training and during a response. Importance is also placed on the need for keeping pre-incident plans up to date and revisiting properties regularly to identify any new hazards or factors that may require revision of the plan.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Professional Ethics

From the moment a fresh recruit first dons the uniform, he or she takes on the mantle of responsibility as a public servant. Both volunteer and career firefighters are relied upon to provide a number of valuable services and to maintain a high level of efficiency, effectiveness, and diligence in performing those services, whether they involve direct interaction with the public, such as responding to a roaring house fire, or are more "behind the scenes," such as hazmat readiness training.

This course reinforces the foundational role of ethics in the fire service and highlights the practical value of ethics in deciding on the proper course of action. After defining ethics and providing examples of ethical violations, the course discusses the central role of ethics in public service, the ethical principles required in the fire service, and practical ways of leading ethically and instilling ethical values in others.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Public Education Programs

Providing fire and injury prevention programs is one of the most important services a department can provide to the community.

This course prepares fire officers to develop, implement, and evaluate effective public education programs that have lasting impact in the community. The course closely follows the five steps in public fire education planning outlined by the U.S. Fire Administration. In addition, it includes tips and strategies for understanding audiences and giving presentations.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


NFPA 1410 SERIES

TargetSolutions’ NFPA 1410 training series illustrates the most commonly practiced fireground evolutions. These video- based courses are written to the NFPA firefighter training standard.

Evolution 01

Because working fires account for only 4% of total calls, the modern-day firefighter must rely on the skills they have learned from training. NFPA? Standard 1410 covers 14 basic firefighting evolutions that review the basic skill sets used often on the fireground. The standard’s goal is to accomplish these basic evolutions, a reasonable completion time, and the expected outcomes. Evolution one requires a forward hose lay using one engine, one supply line, and two handlines in three minutes. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role in the engine company are reviewed.

The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR). Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 02

Fireground evolutions are complex mechanisms. The skills used are not used every day and require regular practice. Faced with an immediate challenge or fireground need, the 21st century firefighter must have immediate recall of a combination of real world and practiced scenarios to rely upon.

In this assignment, a basic explanation of the fireground tactics was explored. Why would a company officer decide to defer water supply to the second due and request that engine two reverse lay in? What are those factors that a company officer uses to formulate this initial arrival decision- one that has such a quick and potentially profound outcome? Success in this evolution requires understanding of the needs of the drill, good pre-planning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 03

Fireground evolutions are complex mechanisms. The skills used are not used every day and require regular practice. Faced with an immediate challenge or fireground need, the 21st century firefighter must have immediate recall of a combination of real-world and practiced scenarios to rely upon.

The 1410 drills are well thought out, scripted, and organized with thorough explanations of the positional skills' expectations and their timing requirements. Evolution 3 explains the procedures and requirements for achieving a two-engine forward lay, and discusses the important roles and responsibilities of the crew members throughout the scenario.

Success in this evolution requires understanding the needs of the drill, good pre-planning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 04

The 1410 drills are well thought out, scripted, and organized with thorough explanations of the positional skills expectations and their timing requirements. This assignment explores a basic explanation of the fireground tactics. The company officer anticipates a need reverse lay and bring the water supply by ways of LDH closer to the fire scene. This action mitigates friction loss before splitting the water into the attack lines.

Why would a company officer make this decision? What are those factors that a company officer uses to formulate this initial arrival decision, one that could have such a quick and potentially profound outcome? This lesson should provide the reader answers to these and other questions.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 05

Because working fires account for only 4% of total calls, the modern-day firefighter must rely on the skills they have learned from training. NFPA Standard 1410 covers 14 basic firefighting evolutions that review the basic skill sets used often on the fireground. The standard’s goal is to accomplish these basic evolutions, a reasonable completion time, and the expected outcomes. Evolution five requires two engines, one supply line, and two handlines to complete a drafting operation in six minutes. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role in both engine companies are reviewed.

The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR). Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 06

Fireground evolutions are complex mechanisms. The skills used are not used every day and require regular practice. Faced with an immediate challenge or fireground need, the 21st century firefighter must have immediate recall of a combination of real world and practiced scenarios to rely upon.

In this scenario, the initial arriving engine will begin a fast attack toward the simulated fire scene and achieve permanent water supply through a water shuttle evolution that will be filling a portable dump tank that the engine will be drafting water from.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 07

Evolution 7 explains the procedures and requirements for executing a reverse lay with a portable ground monitor and discusses the important roles and responsibilities of the crew members throughout the scenario.

Success in this evolution requires understanding the needs of the drill, good pre-planning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 08

Evolution eight requires a single engine company, an engine-mounted master stream appliance, and two supply lines, to complete a forward lay and achieve 500 gpm flow for the master stream within three minutes. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role in the engine company are reviewed. The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR). Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 09

Evolution 9 explains the procedures and requirements to execute use of an aerial apparatus and elevated master stream and discusses the important roles and responsibilities of the crew members throughout the scenario.

Success in this evolution requires understanding of the needs of the drill, good pre-planning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 10

Evolution 10 explains the procedures and requirements to execute a reverse lay from an apparatus equipped with an elevated master stream, using one engine and supplying one handline, and discusses the important roles and responsibilities of the crew members throughout the scenario.

Success in this evolution requires understanding the needs of the drill, good pre-planning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 11

The eleventh evolution requires four supply lines and two engines; one equipped with an elevated master stream device. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role are reviewed. The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR).

Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 12

The twelfth evolution covers how to forward lay with an engine and sprinkler connections with two supply lines. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role are reviewed. The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR).

Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 13

The thirteenth evolution covers how to reverse lay with two supply lines and sprinkler connections. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role are reviewed. The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR).

Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Evolution 14

The fourteenth evolution covers a forward lay from the engine with a single large diameter hose and two supply lines. Fireground tactics and the intricacies of each role are reviewed. The course also covers the importance of a communication plan and an After Action Review (AAR).

Success in every evolution requires understanding the drill, good preplanning, teamwork, communication, and practice.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


NFPA 1500

This series of courses is designed specifically for the fire industry and meets the NFPA 1500 code requirements. These courses were developed in conjunction with the NFPA, and specific content experts at the NFPA participated in their creation.

Advanced HAZWOPER Awareness (Modules 1 – 4)

Watch Video
A hazardous materials incident is defined as the release, or suspected release, of a hazardous material into the environment. Even with the best prevention methods in place, hazardous materials incidents are bound to happen. Understanding the nature of the hazardous materials you work with, and how to respond to an incident or potential incident will help you quickly manage a dangerous situation and minimize damage done to persons, the environment, and facilities. Being able to recognize and quickly request the appropriate aid is the main responsibility of first responders at the awareness level.

First responders at the awareness level are typically workers likely to witness or discover a hazardous materials release within the course of their normal duties. This series review the basics of hazardous materials first responders must know; including identification, effects on the body, decontamination, emergency prevention and more.

 

NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize knowledge on the topic, it is recommended that you take all four modules.

 

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each

Bloodborne Pathogens Safety

Watch Video
Firefighter/EMTs, firefighter/paramedics, fire lieutenants, fire chiefs, and all other EMS providers and healthcare workers are at risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens (BBPs).

Healthcare workers are most at risk for exposure, but workers across many industries are exposed to bloodborne illnesses. Any occupations that deal with blood, medical waste, and other potentially infectious material (OPIM) have the potential for exposure to infection. According to a study published in the journal Prehospital Emergency Care, the expected number of annual occupational hepatitis C seroconversions for firefighter/EMTs was estimated to be 3.4 to 33.7 per 100,000. On the surface, this seems like a small number — it goes without saying that that is of no consolation for those first responders, EMTs, and paramedics that do contract the disease.

This course will review the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard and requirements, as well as some of the diseases associated with BBP occupational exposures.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Combustible & Flammable Liquids

This course covers the two primary hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids: explosion and fire. In order to prevent these hazards, this course and the standard upon which it is based (29 CFR 1910.106), address the primary concerns of design and construction, ventilation, ignition sources, and storage. This training course has 8 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Compressed Gas Safety

Firefighters routinely have the occasion to interact with various compressed gases. This occurs as part of the fire suppression response, fire prevention and inspection efforts, and during technical and rescue operations. The products that the fire service uses range from compressed gas for cutting needs to the everyday usage of oxygen canisters.

Many hazards are involved in the handling, storage, and use of compressed gas. Compressed gases store tremendous amounts of potential energy, which can be hazardous to civilian employees and first responders alike, unless they understand the general requirements and safety measures when working with these substances.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Confined Space Entry

Watch Video
As a firefighter, you may be exposed to the hazards associated with confined space operations. This course will familiarize you with both confined spaces and permit-required confined spaces, showing you how to safely work in and around such areas. You will learn steps you can take to work safely, including the elements of a confined space permit system and the potential hazards associated with confined spaces. This course will teach you how to recognize symptoms of hazard exposure in a confined space, how to respond to those hazards, what equipment needs to be available in confined spaces, and emergency response protocol.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

CPR Academic

National survival rates of cardiac arrest have stubbornly been consistently low and more or less without change for decades, despite advances in medications, procedures, training, and access to 9-1-1, along with first responders, EMTs, and paramedics.

Very few aspects to the care that prehospital rescuers provide have been proven to increase the likelihood of patient survival to hospital discharge. Two factors that stand out as being effective towards survival are early access to defibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) — specifically, continuous, high-quality CPR.

As a firefighter, no matter your level of medical training, there is no other treatment as important as CPR. Your hands are quite literally the patient's heart during a cardiac arrest. Throughout this course you will observe all of the changes to Basic Life Support for healthcare providers, from the optic of a firefighter and first responder.

After completing this course, you will have a broadened set of skills from which to draw upon during hands-on training or real-world calls for service. This course prepares you from the cognitive side. This course is a survey offering that is not intended to replace hands-on training evolutions or continuing education on this dynamic topic. Good outcomes from CPR are linked to frequent training on the part of the rescuers.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Driving Safety

Every year over 42,000 preventable deaths are attributed to vehicle incidents. Traffic accidents are a leading cause of incidental deaths among US workers. This training course presents information to aid employees in operating vehicles safely. This training program has 13 learning modules with a 10- question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Hazard Communication

Watch Video
Exposure to hazardous chemicals can present numerous dangers to workers. More than 32 million workers are exposed to one or more chemical hazards across various industrial sectors. And with hundreds of new hazardous chemicals being introduced annually, in addition to the estimated 650,000 already existing hazardous chemical products, the risk is increasing every year.

OSHA's hazard communication standard is designed to ensure the information about these dangers is shared with those who need to know. This course covers OSHA's hazard communication standard with an emphasis on what it is and how to comply. It also provides guidelines to help prevent chemical hazard incidents and the adverse health effects that may result. More than one-third of all American workers are exposed to one or more chemical hazards across the various industrial sectors.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

HAZMAT Spill Prevention & Control

Hazardous materials can be used effectively and safely, if care is taken in their handling, storage, and disposal. However, a hazardous materials spill can be a threat to the safety of the company, the environment, and employees. In order to protect themselves, employees should understand and be aware of hazardous materials handling, storage, and disposal requirements.

This course discusses several aspects of hazardous materials by examining the responsibilities of a hazardous materials program; storage requirements; and strategies for cleaning up spills. This training course has 7 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

HAZMAT Transportation

Preventing spills, fires, and explosions of hazardous materials during transportation is a major goal of the U.S. Department of Transportation. To protect the environment, the public, and employees from such incidents, they have developed and adopted rigorous standards for packaging and identifying hazardous materials that are shipped by any mode of transportation.

This course will discuss general Department of Transportation classifications, and requirements for packaging and shipping hazardous materials. Hazardous materials must be properly prepared for shipment. This training course has 14 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Laboratory Safety

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), recognizing the unique characteristics of the laboratory workplace, tailored a standard for occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories to include approximately 934,000 employees in 34,214 industrial, clinical, and academic laboratories.

This course describes the requirements of the Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories, including the written chemical hygiene plan to ensure employees are protected from all potentially hazardous chemicals in use in their work area(s). This training course has 14 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Materials Handling, Storage, Use & Disposal

More employees are injured in industry occupations while moving materials than while performing any other single function.

This course discusses strategies employees can practice remaining safe while performing work functions that require the handling, storage, use, or disposal of materials. In addition to basic warehouse safety, this course also explores chemical safety concepts, guidelines for forklift and man lift operations, requirements for vehicle and machinery use, and precautions for working with hazardous materials. More employees are injured moving materials than while performing any other single function. This training course has 11 learning modules and a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Personal Protective Equipment

The purpose of PPE is to shield or isolate individuals from the chemical, physical and biological hazards that may be encountered. This course describes the different types of PPE, as well as how to select and maintain PPE. This training course has 11 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the Fire Industry

Watch Video
There are moments in life that are so horrifying and graphic that they are vividly disturbing in a guttural way that is on a scale no person should ever have to see or endure. Unfortunately, tragedies do and will continue to occur. In each instance, the men and women of the fire and EMS services are summoned to help stabilize and start the process of putting things back together for the citizens they so faithfully serve. This is done at all hours and under any condition, where the best interests of others are placed first and before their own. However, each of these incidents takes a toll upon first responders. Even if they are unaware of the impact at that moment, repeated exposures can systematically affect mental wellbeing.

Throughout this course, you will learn the progression from exposure to behavioral health issues, how a mental health crisis presents, and the deadly consequence of responder suicide.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

Respiratory Protection

The objective of this training course is to provide basic information on the selection, use and maintenance of respiratory protective devices so that they may be used in a safe and effective manner.

This training course has 9 learning modules with a ten-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Welding Safety

Welding, cutting and brazing are hazardous activities that pose a unique combination of both safety and health risks to more than 500,000 workers in a wide variety of industries. The risk from fatal injuries alone is more than four deaths per thousand workers over a working lifetime. Even with advances in control technology, welders continue to be exposed to hazardous welding fumes and gases.

This course introduces basic techniques for keeping workers safe. This training course has 13 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


GENERAL

Assembly Occupancy Fire and Life Safety Inspection

This course discusses the inspector's role in conducting a fire and life safety inspection at public assembly and large gathering areas. Keep in mind that this is a general approach to conducting Assembly Occupancy Fire and Life Safety Inspections and references the International Building and Fire Codes as well as the National Fire Protection Association NFPA1 Fire Code and NFPA 101 Life Safety Code. While these code making bodies have provisions that are specific to their agency, not each code citation may exist in the other code book. An inspector has the responsibility of being familiar with the codes utilized in their jurisdiction.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Building Construction

"No two buildings are the same, which means no two fires are ever the same. Firefighters need a solid background in building construction types, materials and methods used, how the buildings are used by their occupants, how age affects the structural integrity, and how remodeling can change buildings.

This course identifies and differentiates the 5 types of building construction; explains how building construction types are affected by fire; and discusses the specific hazards to firefighters in different building construction types and materials.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Carbon Monoxide

Carbon Monoxide is one of the most common hazards firefighters face on the job. Firefighters may find harmful concentrations as they go about their daily work responding to alarms in homes and businesses, motor vehicle accidents in tunnels and, of course, structure fires. They are even exposed to it daily in quarters, though today it's rare to find harmful levels of carbon monoxide in properly ventilated apparatus bays. This course will increase firefighter's awareness of carbon monoxide and its dangers.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Customer Service for Fire Department Personnel

The fire service is a customer-oriented industry. It exists to serve the public and to provide services such as safety and protection, rescue, and medical aid. For this reason, all fire service personnel need to have excellent customer service skills. Using these basic skills when interacting with others, whether they are department colleagues or members of the public, can create a more positive experience. It can also contribute to making the community more supportive of the fire service, which is critical for any taxpayer-funded organization. Customer service is a vital part of the mission of fire service agencies.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Electric and Alternative Fuel Vehicles for First Responders

Both electric and alternative fuel vehicles have seen exponential growth in sales over the past few years. Many people around the nation are investing in these modes of transportation for a variety of reasons. Between 2013 and 2017, sales of electric vehicles saw a 641 percent increase in sales. Today's electric and alternative fuel vehicles come in wide range of sizes from small cars and pickup trucks to SUVs, large buses, garbage trucks, and semi-trucks.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Emergency Response to Terrorism (Modules 1–4)

Watch Video
This Introductory Guide for First Responders is essential for those employees who may be among the first to arrive at an incident of suspicious origin. It is intended to be a general introduction to the basic concepts for first-responder awareness at the scene of a potential terrorist incident.

NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize retention of the course material, all four modules must be completed within 365 days of starting the course to receive a certificate of completion.

 

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s) Each

Ethics

Ethics are a relevant part of the job as firefighters. As representatives of the fire service, everything firefighters do reflects not only on them, but on their departments and the fire service as a whole.

This course discusses ethics, their importance to the fire service, and their importance to firefighters' careers. It also explores how firefighters can conduct themselves with high standards as representatives of the fire service, and assists in applying strong ethics to decision making throughout their fire-service careers.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire & EMS Grant Writing

Funding is critical to Fire and EMS operations. Equipment, staffing, training all require funding, and the level they require can increase from year to year. This can be challenging when city, state, and other parent organization budgets are already strapped for cash or cutting back in difficult economic times. Yet without maintaining adequate funding, operations are less effective, the community is under served, and lives are put at risk--both those of personnel and of members of the community.

This course aims to educate Fire and EMS personnel on the skills and tasks necessary for successful grant writing, from the beginning stages of needs assessment and grant research to procuring resources with the allocated grant funds. Key emphasis is placed on federal grants and strategies are proposed for writing grants that successfully reach panel review.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Alarm Systems

This course assists firefighters in understanding the advantages of having alarm systems in occupancies; to describe the fundamental configuration and components of alarm systems; and to discuss general principles for responding to alarms, which will ensure safety for the occupants and firefighters.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Industry Driver Intersection Safety

Collisions involving emergency related vehicles is a constant and growing concern. Intersection collisions are the most serious of these incidents. Statistics from the United States Fire Administration, National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, National Safety Council, among others, depict a growing concern and need for awareness surrounding these incidents.

In conjunction with VFIS, the Volunteer Combination Officer Section of the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), The National Volunteer Fire Council, and the National Fire Protection Association, TargetSolutions has developed this course to highlight the principles and practices emergency responders must consider with regard to all motor vehicles, while examining potential risks associated with the operation and presence of an emergency vehicle.

The course incorporates long established VFIS intersection safety techniques and seat belt use protocols as best practices in emergency vehicle safe operations.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Industry Driver Operator

Roadways are a dangerous place for emergency responders. According to the NFPA, in 2005 there were an estimated 15,885 collisions involving fire department emergency vehicles while departments were responding to or returning from incidents. And many more are injured annually from other emergency vehicle related accidents as well. Operating an emergency vehicle is a responsibility you should take seriously to minimize the risk of injury and death to yourself and others, as well as damage to expensive equipment. Since hands-on experience is a key element to operating an emergency vehicle safely, it is recommended that you attend an approved driving course for emergency responders if you are the driver of an emergency vehicle.

This training course reviews the physical characteristics and features of large vehicles, the principles of safe driving, and highlights the risks you may encounter on the road as a driver and a passenger in an emergency vehicle. Understanding these concepts can help ensure you and your co-workers arrive safely on the scene.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Industry Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior

Wildfires are a crucial part of natural ecosystems, but also one of the most destructive forces known to man. Within these two extremes lie the responsibilities of the wildland firefighter, who must not only be able to use his skills to protect and preserve human life but is also occasionally called upon to use those same skills for the positive benefit of the ecosystem. Firefighters use a technique called "controlled burn," in which they deliberately set and then manage a fire to properly maintain a fire dependent ecosystem.

This course will explore fire prevention, fire management, and the individual responsibilities of firefighters when fighting wildland fires.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Prevention and Public Education

Fire prevention activities done by fire departments to help themselves, and in the form of public education programs, are proven strategies to reduce the carnage brought to citizens and firefighters alike by fire. This course identifies common fire hazards in homes and businesses; explains the differences between surveys, inspections, and home fire safety surveys and the importance of each; and discusses why and how to create a fire prevention public education program.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Fire Service: Health & Safety

Course Duration: Hour(s)

First Responder Hybrid Vehicle Incidents

This course explores the principals of hybrid technology as it relates to first responders. While not intended as a substitute to practical training, this course presents a basic overview of hybrid incident response: identifying, immobilizing, and disabling hybrid vehicles, and accessing occupants. Hybrid technology is ever-evolving and rescuers will experience improvements in vehicle technologies and new hazards carried with them. Responders should take advantage of any opportunities to learn about emerging vehicle technologies and continue to familiarize themselves with field resource guides. Remember, there is no substitute for participation in field extrication training.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

First Responder Operations Level Refresher (Modules 1-4)

Watch Video
This series is designed to be a refresher for the Operations Level Responder to Hazardous Materials Incidents, meeting the requirements of NFPA 472 and 29 CFR 1910.120(q). The courses are divided into four modules. Each module should take approximately two hours to complete.

The first module covers how to survey a hazmat spill or incident; how to collect hazard and response information with MSDSs, labels, and markings; and how to identify the various transport containers and storage tanks used for hazardous materials.

The second module covers the chemical and physical properties of materials and their impact on storage and transport containers; response objectives, including how to assess the risk to a responder for each hazard class; and how to determine the suitability of SCBA and personal protective equipment.

The third module covers the principles of site management, how to establish and enforce control zones, and tactics for emergency decontamination. It will discuss common types of releases and how to deal with them, and how to conduct defensive operations such as damming and diking and air monitoring.

The fourth module covers incident management systems and the first responder's role in a response plan. It will also cover the potential for terrorist attacks, typical agents used in a terrorist event, and the appropriate response tactics.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each

Firefighter Rehabilitation (Modules 1 & 2)

This course reviews the requirements and guidelines for rehab operations. The course discusses topics contained in the NFPA 1584 Standard, and is divided into two modules. The first module discusses aspects related to the regulations and standards pertinent to rehab and their requirements, such as rehab staff roles and responsibilities, pre-incident preparation, and setting up rehab operations at the scene. The second module discusses the practical aspects of rehab related to evaluation and treatment for personnel entering rehab.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each

Fire Service Health and Safety Part I

Watch Video
This course presents the concepts, science, and economics of fire service-related health and safety. Modern firefighters need to have a full appreciation of these interconnected concepts. Fire service personnel know their professional world is different than anyone else’s. Physical disease and behavioral disorders impact firefighters in ways that both mirror and differ from civilians. These disorders can be unique, yet still clearly identifiable and quantifiable to those looking for them.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s) Each

Fire Service Health and Safety Part II

Watch Video
The modern firefighter needs to have an appreciation for the interconnected concepts of health and safety. Fire service personnel know that their professional world is different than that of all others. With this uniqueness comes exposure to compounds in various physical states that may predispose the 21st century firefighter to cancer in rates that legacy firefighters never could have envisioned. This course will present the concepts, science and economics associated with health and safety, especially as it relates to cancers and the fire service. In this course, we will identify chemicals of combustion commonly encountered by firefighters and discuss the impact of these chemicals on human health. We will also discuss wellness best practices and ways to help prevent exposure to harmful chemicals in the workplace.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s) Each

High Rise Fire and Life Safety Inspection

The International Building Code defines a high rise as any structure that has an occupied floor more than 75 feet above the lowest level of fire department vehicle access.

The prevention of fire and rapid evacuation of high rise building occupants is an important and necessary concern for fire inspectors. This course will discuss the inspector?s role in conducting a fire and life safety inspection at a high rise building.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

How to Read a Building

How a structure is built, and the materials that are used, directly affect how a fire will grow and spread. Knowledge of construction methods and materials gives firefighters some advantage when sizing up a building and preparing to attack a fire.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Leadership and Ethics

This course will explore the role of leadership and ethics as it applies to the fire service. In this course, you will learn how to create and maintain ethical leadership at every level of your agency.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Maximizing Your Volunteer Firefighter Recruitment Efforts with an Effective Open House

For many years, open houses have been a popular community outreach event for volunteer and combination fire departments around the county. However, trying to keep citizens engaged and encouraging department involvement can be a daunting task. As a department, are you getting the most you can out of open houses? Do you focus on public education, safety, and the recruitment of potential new volunteers? All three aspects are equally as important. This course will share information on preparing, planning, and executing a successful open house. Follow along and learn the ways to host a community engaging, educating and entertaining event.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

NFPA 1 & 101: Module 1

This course, which focuses on the 2015 Florida-specific version updates to NFPA? 1 Fire Code and NFPA? 101 Life Safety Code for Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors I and II, is part one of a four-part series. Each module will address important code updates to keep Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors abreast of changes and enable Florida-state compliancy in the Fire Inspector role. Module 1 addresses NFPA? 1: Florida-Specific Fire Code through Chapter 13.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1 & 101: Module 2

This course, which focuses on the 2015 Florida-specific version updates to NFPA? 1 Fire Code and NFPA? 101 Life Safety Code for Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors I and II, is part two of a four-part series. Each module will address important code updates to keep Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors abreast of changes and enable Florida-state compliancy in the Fire Inspector role. Module 2 addresses NFPA? 1: Florida-Specific Fire Code, Chapters 14-75.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1 & 101: Module 3

This course, which focuses on the 2015 Florida-specific version updates to NFPA? 1 Fire Code and NFPA? 101 Life Safety Code for Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors I and II, is part three of a four-part series. Each module will address important code updates to keep Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors abreast of changes and enable Florida-state compliancy in the Fire Inspector role. Module 3 addresses NFPA? 101: Florida-Specific Life Safety Code, Chapters 1-6.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1 & 101: Module 4

This series focuses on the 2015 Florida-specific version updates to NFPA 1 Fire Code and NFPA 101 Life Safety Code for Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors I and II. Each module will address important code updates to keep Florida-Certified Fire Inspectors abreast of changes and enable Florida-state compliancy in the Fire Inspector role. Module 1 addresses NFPA 1: Florida-Specific Fire Code through Chapter 13. Module 2 addresses NFPA 1: Florida-Specific Fire Code, Chapters 14-75. Module 3 addresses NFPA 101: Florida-Specific Life Safety Code, Chapters 1-6. Module 4 addresses NFPA? 101: Florida-Specific Life Safety Code, Chapters 7-31.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1041 Part 1

NFPA1041 is divided into three certifications at the NPQ/IFSAC level: Instructor I, II and III. These levels represent the various degrees of knowledge and skills required to function as an instructor. This standard affects firefighters, company officers, chief officers and fire academy personnel (training officers).

The first level introduces student learning psychology, preparing and presenting a topic, instructor credibility, and assessment requirements.

This course, combined with levels two and three, provides a natural progression for an individual to develop from entry-level instructor to chief of training.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

NFPA 1041 Part 2

NFPA1041 is divided into three certifications at the NPQ/IFSAC level: Instructor I, II and III. These levels represent the various degrees of knowledge and skills required to function as an instructor. This standard affects firefighters, company officers, chief officers and fire academy personnel (training officers).

The second level addresses curriculum development and provides additional information on the requisite knowledge and skills of level one.

This course, combined with levels one and three, provides a natural progression for an individual to develop from entry-level instructor to chief of training.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1041 Part 3

NFPA1041 is divided into three certifications at the NPQ/IFSAC level: Instructor I, II and III. These levels represent the various degrees of knowledge and skills required to function as an instructor. This standard affects firefighters, company officers, chief officers and fire academy personnel (training officers).

The third level prepares the instructor for selecting instructors, proposal developments, bid specifications, in-depth training analysis and training-related investigations. Important points from levels one and two are briefly reviewed as well.

This course, combined with levels one and two, provides a natural progression for an individual to develop from entry-level instructor to chief of training.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

NFPA 1403 Live Fire Training Evolutions

Watch Video
Although the number of on-duty firefighter fatalities has been declining, the proportion of deaths related to training has been increasing, according to NFPA data. In the last decade, over 100 firefighters have died during training activities, and live-fire training is typically a leading cause of training-related fatalities.

This course reviews live-burn evolutions and emphasizes the importance of safety and compliance with state regulations, NFPA standards, and local policies, and procedures established to maintain training effectiveness without compromising safety.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

NFPA 1584 Firefighter Rehabilitation

Firefighting is a labor-intense occupation. The heavy physical and mental demands placed on firefighters in an emergency can push the human body to its limits and sometimes beyond it. Over half of all fatalities in the fire service are caused by stress, overexertion, and related medical issues, and these also contribute to a large proportion of injuries and illnesses among fire personnel.

To protect themselves from overworking and allow them to continue operations in a safe and effective manner, firefighters need to make sure they rest, rehydrate, and reenergize at regular intervals during operations and training exercises.

This course reviews the requirements and guidelines for rehab operations. The course discusses topics contained in the NFPA 1584 Standard and is divided into two modules. The first module discusses aspects related to the regulations and standards pertinent to rehab and their requirements, such as rehab staff roles and responsibilities, pre-incident preparation, and setting up rehab operations at the scene. The second module discusses the practical aspects of rehab related to evaluation and treatment for personnel entering rehab.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 1851 Cancer-Related Risks of Firefighting

Watch Video
This course, which is guided by NFPA® 1851, Standard on Selection, Care, and Maintenance of Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting (2014), aims to provide a thorough understanding of fire-service-related cancer risks for today’s firefighters and fire personnel.

The importance of turnout gear care, maintenance, and inspections will be stressed, along with responsibilities for proper decontamination, isolation, and reporting of issues. Turnout gear interface areas and their potential weaknesses will be explained, including target organs that may be affected by repeated exposures to carcinogens when interface areas are breached.

Finally, the course will present eight of the most common carcinogens a firefighter may regularly face in today’s homes, and how those chemicals develop within closed-space fire environments.

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s)

NFPA 3000: Standard for Preparedness and Response to Active Shooter and/or Hostile Events

Watch Video

This course is for suitable for all levels of first responders, firefighters, and paramedics, and emergency medical technicians at the basic and intermediate levels. There is not a one-size-fits-all approach in regard to how a given jurisdiction handles an active shooter event. This in-depth course incorporates the National Fire Protection Association's NFPA 3000™ (PS) Standard for an Active Shooter/Hostile Event Response (ASHER) Program standard, along with other recommended practices from law enforcement, fire rescue, and emergency medical service (EMS) resources, echoing the NFPA® statement on equivalency.

 

The course conveys multiple aspects to an ASHER Program. These range from preparedness and training to response expectations, on-scene actions, and incident command and community recovery. Because each community is unique and has varied resources and institutional beliefs that ultimately will be a prime motivating factor in the breadth and depth of the response and action by its first responders, this course will convey the national optic on the subject and tie it together with evidenced-based findings.

 

To that end, throughout this course, you will find data sets that have been compiled by the nations law enforcement agencies during active shooter events and mass killings, the lessons learned by fire rescue and EMS providers during the events, and what best practices can be created that may provide immediate and tangible lifesaving interventions to the victims of Criminal Mass Casualty Incidents.

 

For fire, EMS, law enforcement, dispatchers, and public safety personnel, there is a regretful realization that Criminal Mass Casualty Incidents are not going away. Ardently facing this reality, the respective professions must better understand what may lie ahead, properly prepare and train, safely and tactically respond, and then recover from what has occurred to them and their communities.

Course Duration: 1.5 Hour(s)

Portable Extinguishers: Types and Usage

In the workplace, fires and explosions are responsible for more than two hundred deaths and five thousand injuries each year. Does your department have an emergency plan for each of its stations? What is your evacuation path in case of smoke or fire in the building?

This course reviews the steps to take when a fire is discovered, how to use a fire extinguisher and the limits of portable fire extinguishers.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Rope, Rope Rescue, Knots

Watch Video
Ropes are elemental and ubiquitous to the role of the fire service. From bailouts to hoisting operations, during high angle and low angle rescues, on varied terrains, during searches and rescue operations, ropes and webbing are part of every firefighter's toolkit. Being able to demonstrate recollection based muscle memory in a zero visibility immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) environment isn’t nice to have, it is intrinsic to the job and your very survival.

This course on ropes has something to offer for all firefighters. From those newly certified at the Firefighter-I level, working as a Firefighter-II, or those functioning as an Awareness, Operations, or Technician level member of a specialty team during Confined Space, Swiftwater, or Rope Rescue emergencies.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

School Fire and Life Safety Inspection

Each day children and adults gather in schools for learning, sports events, and other community events.

The prevention of fire and rapid evacuation of those children and adults is an important and necessary concern for fire inspectors. This course discusses the inspector’s role in conducting a fire and life safety inspection at a school.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Water Supply

Water is the most commonly used extinguishing agent. Water is able to absorb heat, it is readily available, and its inexpensive cost makes it a widely used extinguishing agent. Effective fireground operations require knowledge of the available sources for water, or your water supply. The location of primary and secondary water sources is imperative. Without a reliable supply of water, fire conditions will deteriorate rapidly.

This course explains how to calculate minimum water supplies for fire suppression operations; identifies pressurized, non-pressurized, and natural water sources; and discusses how to access water from various sources and deliver it to the fireground using mobile water supply apparatus.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)


WILDLAND FIREFIGHTING

RT-130 Annual Wildland Fire Safety Refresher (Modules 1–4)

Watch Video
Wildland fires pose a risk both to communities and to the firefighters who work to protect them. Increasing urban sprawl has only heightened that risk, bringing urban and wildland areas into ever closer proximity. As a result, fires in this wildland/urban interface have become more common, costing more than $20 billion since 1970.

The number of fireline fatalities that occur in wildland fires is a tragic reminder of the dangers that can arise from unanticipated changes in fire behavior. Sudden changes in the rate of spread can quickly turn a situation that appeared to be relatively under control into one in which shelter deployment and escape are necessary.

Situational awareness is a key survival strategy in wildland firefighting. Knowing what is around you and making quick decisions can make the difference between life and death. The most significant hazard, entrapment, can be avoided by staying alert and monitoring for changes that could portend extreme fire behavior.

During wildland fire operations, firefighters encounter numerous hazards. Between 2001 and 2010 over 200 firefighters have died while participating in wildland fire suppression activities. The dangers are real and sometimes the difference between injury and non-injury, between life and death, is one quick decision in the heat of the moment. Whether you will make the right decision in that moment will depend in great measure on your level of training and awareness.

This Wildland Fire Safety Refresher course provides firefighters the opportunity to review both the fundamentals of wildland fire firefighting and critical hazards and safety strategies in wildland operations. Included in the modules are discussions of topics recommended for the US National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) Annual Refresher.

Module 1 provides an overview of recent issues and incidents in wildland firefighting and reviews the fundamentals of safety in wildland firefighting operations.

Module 2 provides an overview of wildland fire behavior and strategies for predicting changes in behavior that could lead to hazardous conditions.

Module 3 provides an overview of situational awareness and injury prevention in wildland fire operations.

Module 4 provides an overview of safety strategies particular to wildland fire operations.

 

NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize knowledge on the topic, it is recommended that you take all four modules.

 

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each

S-190 Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior (Modules 1–4)

Explores the essentials of wildland fire behavior and analyzes how fires spread, the impactful role of weather, and the seven environment factors. This course features more than thirty learning modules and eight hours of training across four courses. NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize knowledge on the topic, it is recommended that you take all four modules.

NOTE: This training program consists of four learning modules. To maximize knowledge on the topic, it is recommended that you take all four modules.

 

Course Duration: 2 Hour(s) Each


ARFF TRAINING

TargetSolutions is pleased to offer valuable training for airport firefighters. The 17-course bundle delivers 13 hours of training featuring video- and scenario-based lessons.

Adapting and Using Structural Equipment

Airport firefighters need to be able to adapt structural fire and rescue equipment for the airport crash/fire/rescue application. This course lists the firefighting tools and equipment used for aircraft emergencies, and identifies procedures used by fire departments to adapt structural fire-fighting equipment for aircraft rescue and firefighting.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Aircraft Cargo Hazards, Part 1-2

Les Omans from the ARFF Working Group begins a two-part look at aircraft cargo hazards. In this course, he takes us to the cargo facilities of Airborne Express and Federal Express to look at loading and entering a cargo plane and the hazards that may be found there.

Part II: In this course on aircraft cargo hazards, Les Omans looks at the labeling and packaging of hazardous materials. This important lesson includes information on the loading of packages into the cargo plane, as well as how to read packaging slips and labeling codes.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s) for Part 1, 0.5 Hour(s) for Part 2

Aircraft Familiarization

In this course, we'll tour a typical narrow-bodied commercial jet aircraft. We'll identify on-board hazards and demonstrate how to open all doors and compartments.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Aircraft Rescue - Emergency Communications

Get ready for a lesson on the phonetic alphabet and aircraft hand signals. These are just two of the training points presented in this ARFF course as instructors cover communication systems necessary for aircraft rescue. Also covered are the requirements of section 4 on emergency communications systems at an airport, in the FAA’s requirements for certified airports, part 139.319(j).

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Airport Rescue and Firefighting Ops

Watch Video
In this lesson, ARFF personnel will get specific training on incident control strategies and tactics. Watch as actual aircraft emergencies are highlighted and then "You Make the Call" for the various emergency scenarios.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Application of Extinguishing Agents (Parts 1-4)

Les Omans of the ARFF working group begins a four-part look at the application of extinguishing agents. In this first course, he’ll cover the types of fuels associated with aircraft rescue and firefighting. Users will learn the common mistakes in the application and use of foam agents; the types and properties of aviation fuel; and the types and properties of polar solvents. The second course discusses flash point, explosive limits, vapor density, specific gravity and wicking, and defines flammable and combustible liquids.

In the third course, topics include mechanical foams and proportioning for crash fire rescue; extinguishing properties of each agent; quantity of each type of agent kept in inventory for vehicle resupply; and the preferred agents to be used in hydrocarbon fuel and polar solvent fires. In the last of four courses, Les Omans demonstrates foam drain out and gives examples of the different types of extinguishing agents.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Aviation Incident Response/Crash Rescue Management

In this course, we highlight two departments who discovered the realities of crash rescue management (CRM). Exactly one month after Sept. 11, 2001, New York City was hit with another aircraft tragedy. A passenger jet crashed into a Queens neighborhood, destroying homes and taking lives. This course presents firsthand accounts from FDNY firefighters about the operational and emotional challenges they faced throughout this incident. We also visit the Charlotte (NC) Fire Department and learn from their experience in responding to the plane crash incident at the Charlotte-Douglas Airport on Jan. 7, 2003.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Command and Control of Aircraft Incidents

Large plane crash incidents are usually multi-agency, multi-jurisdictional operations. Join Capt. Bob Hilvers as he discusses Incident Command and the need for specific incident command practices at aircraft crash rescues. This course is an update of an earlier course, revised to comply with new FAA regulations (CFR139).

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Emergency Aircraft Evacuation

One of the primary definitions of rescue operations for airport firefighters is to maintain a habitable environment around the fuselage and to assist with aircraft evacuation by stabilizing slide chutes and controlling the evacuees. Firefighters shall become familiar with FAA Advisory Circular AC-150/5210-7C that refers to communications between the Incident Commander and the aircraft flight deck.

FETN’s Aircraft Fire Rescue Training series continues with a look at the emergency aircraft evacuation assistance provided by crews of air carriers. This course examines aircraft emergencies from the perspective of the pilot and crew.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Out of the Blue

Aircraft incidents are rare events. Many firefighters may go their entire career without responding to one. The fire service, however, needs to maintain a high level of training and awareness because firefighters must be specially trained to perform duties involving aircraft fires and rescue. Firefighters should maintain an awareness of the many hazards and dangers in responding to these types of incidents.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Personnel Safety

This course offers training for ARFF rescue personnel concerning the purpose and limitations of approved protective clothing. Instructors demonstrate proper donning and use of protective equipment applicable in aircraft rescue and firefighting.

Course Duration: 0.5 Hour(s)

Vehicle Rescue

This course addresses the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) requirements for additional training of ARFF personnel, along with an update on basic vehicle rescue. See how techniques used during vehicle extrications can be beneficial to your aircraft fire and rescue training.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)

Water Rescue

This course helps departments meet the requirements of section 12 of the FAA's Part 139.319 (j). Users will learn about personal safety hazards, basic water rescue equipment and techniques utilized by airport rescue departments, how to respond to special situations, and how to address important techniques for water rescue incidents at or near airports.

Course Duration: 1 Hour(s)



PARTNERED CONTENT

MSA G1 SCBA Care & Use

Course Duration: Hour(s)

MSA ALTAIR 4X Multigas Detector Care & Use

Course Duration: Hour(s)

MSA ALTAIR 5X Multigas Detector Care & Use

Course Duration: Hour(s)